Goucher College 2024-2025 Undergraduate Catalogue 
    
    Jul 18, 2024  
Goucher College 2024-2025 Undergraduate Catalogue

General Academic Information


Table of Contents

Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts Degree      Course Load
Residency Requirement      Audits
Goucher Commons Requirements      Withdrawal from Courses
     Other Bachelor of Arts Requirements      Add/Drop Deadlines for Courses
The Major, Minor and Concentration      Pass/No Pass
Other Academic Opportunities      Determination of Rank
     Independent Work      Grading System
     Senior Thesis      Grade Appeal Policy
     Academic Internships           Grounds for Appeal
     Goucher Prison Education Partnership      Incomplete Grade Procedure
     Graduate Credits           Resolution of Incompletes
     Baltimore Student Exchange Program      Repeated Courses
     Transfer Work      Assessment 
          Advanced Placement (AP) Credits      Final Experience/Examination
     ROTC      Course Reflections
     3+2 Dual Degree in Engineering  Academic Support
Academic Procedures      Academic Advising
     Commencement     Academic Center for Excellence
     Academic Responsibilities    
     Academic Honor Code    
     Academic Progress Towards a Degree      Career Education Office
          GPA Standards Honors and Awards
          Calculation of GPA  

Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts Degree

One hundred twenty (120) credit hours are required for the degree. A student must achieve a minimum 2.0 cumulative GPA and a minimum grade of C- in each course that is counted toward fulfilling the requirements of the major. Credit hours at Goucher are defined on a semester basis, as distinct from a trimester or quarter basis. Candidates for the degree must complete a minimum of 60 credit hours at Goucher College.

Residency Requirement

Twelve of the last 24 credit hours must be completed at Goucher unless granted an exception with the approval from the department chair of the major and the Associate Provost for Undergraduate Studies. Exceptions may be granted for approved summer courses and study-abroad programs or other programs. These approved non-Goucher credits shall ordinarily be completed within two semesters following the petition date to avoid withdrawal from the College. Credits taken out of residency, should follow the Transfer Credit Policy at https://www.goucher.edu/policies/documents/Transfer-of-Credit-Policy.pdf.  Contact the Registrar’s Office for approval of specific non-Goucher courses.

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Goucher Commons Requirements (GCR)

Like other colleges and universities, Goucher expects all of its students to pursue a common set of learning experiences. These experiences are not based on a core curriculum or checklist of requirements, and students have great freedom to determine and then follow their own interests. In this pursuit, students enter into a space of inquiry - the Goucher Commons - with other students and the faculty.

All GCR’s are satisfied with a grade of “D-” or “P” (or better). Students should be aware that for the foreign language and culture sequence a grade of “C-” or better must be received in the 110- and 120-levels in order to advance to the next course level (120, 130, 132, or 133). A grade of “D-” or “P” (or better) in the terminal course in the foreign language and culture sequence satisfies the Foreign Language and Culture GCR.

1. First Year Seminar  

2. Complex Problem Exploration Courses  

3. Proficiency Areas:

4. Common Inquiry Areas:

5. Capstone Experience/Signature Project  

Study Abroad

Students may study abroad on Goucher ICAs (intensive courses abroad), or non-Goucher short-term programs at any time during their undergraduate experience, provided that they obtain approval from their advisors and the Office of Global Education. Students pursuing semester or year-long study abroad programs must have spent at least three semesters in residence at an accredited college or university. All coursework abroad must be taken for a letter grade. Pass/No Pass coursework abroad, while potentially allowed by certain study abroad programs, is not allowed by Goucher College. Students may fulfill the study abroad requirement by pursuing an international internship for at least four credits. Students choosing to fulfill the requirement with an internship must work with the CEO, their advisors, and the Office of Global Education. All semester students enroll in the 1-credit Study Abroad Immersion Course (IDS 201) while abroad. The Immersion course is a required complement to the Study Abroad GCR and students must pass IDS 201 (or have the Immersion component embedded in a study abroad course) in order to complete the Study Abroad GCR.   The Policy for Study Abroad Substitution Request is available at: https://www.goucher.edu/policies/documents/Study-Abroad-Substitution-Request-Policy.pdf.

Generally, students can carry their institutional financial aid abroad on Goucher semester programs. Students cannot carry their institutional financial aid on any non-Goucher semester-abroad programs but can carry any federal aid such as Pell Grants or Stafford Loans.

Financial Aid for International Study

Federal financial aid does not apply to summer or January term study abroad programs.

Scholarships for International Study

Scholarships for study abroad are available through the Office of International Studies. These include:

The Constance R. Caplan ‘57 Scholarship Fund

The Michele and Marty Cohen P ‘10 Scholarship Fund

The Rosa and Herman Cohen Scholarship

The Suzanne Fineman Cohen ‘56 International Scholars Fund

The Klara Farkas P ‘66 and Georgette Farkas Balance ‘66 Scholarship Fund

The Josephine Levy Kohn ‘36 Scholarship Fund

The Hajime Mitarai Memorial Fund

The Leslie Savage Nelson Mahoney 1912 Scholarship

The Katherine Manning-Munce 1919 Scholarship Fund

The Phyllis Koller Schreter ‘43 Fund for Study Abroad

The Selz Foundation Scholarship Fund

The Louise Scholl Tuttle ‘36 Scholarship Fund for Foreign Language Study

The Ungar Family Endowed Study-Abroad Fund

The Carol Fain Walters ‘57 Scholarship

The David and Marilyn Southard Warshawsky ‘68 Scholarship

The Margaret Messler Winslow ‘69 Fund for International Education

Scholarships for summer international internships are available from the Career Education Office (CEO).

Study-Abroad Deposits

Students participating in Intensive Courses Abroad must pay a non-refundable $500 program deposit to confirm participation if accepted. Specific program deadlines are set each semester by the Office of Global Education. 

Refunds

If for any reason, a student withdraws from a Goucher semester or short-term program after the deposit deadline (or, the deadline of our partner institutions), the student will not be entitled to a refund of any fees paid to Goucher, including program deposit, tuition fees, travel fees, program fees, or any other fees incurred in connection with the program. If, due to any unforeseen circumstances or other circumstances beyond the control of the College, a semester or short-term Goucher program is cancelled, either prior to departure or during the course of the program, the student will not be guaranteed a refund of any fees paid to Goucher, including program deposit, tuition fees, travel fees, program fees, or any other fees incurred in connection with the program. In most cases, the College forwards program fees to vendors in foreign countries, making it very difficult to recover such fees due to a program cancellation. In such cases, the College will make a good-faith effort to recover such fees and to return any portion of fees that it may recover that may be attributable to a student’s participation in the program. However, the College makes no guarantees regarding the recovery of fees and is not liable for any fees that it is unable to recover.

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Other Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements

  1. At least 3 credits in each of the following areas as designated by the Registrar: Arts , Humanities and Interdisciplinary Studies , Social and Behavioral Sciences , and Biological and Physical Sciences . These disciplinary requirements can be fulfilled by courses in a major or minor, courses that fulfill other Goucher Commons requirements, and/or additional designated courses throughout the curriculum.
  2. First Year Experience, FYE 134, a required course for all new first-year students (not required for transfer students), continues the orientation process and connects learning that occurs for students both inside and outside of the classroom.  Students discuss the concept of being active participants in the Goucher community and explore its implications for emotional, intellectual, social, and physical well-being. Throughout the course students will be exposed to a variety of perspectives to develop a sense of respect for differing viewpoints, to learn the value of individual responsibility, and to understand the importance of personal accountability. Students will have the opportunity to build community, develop relationships with peers, and discover their sense of place at Goucher.  Successful completion of the course is a graduation requirement for all students except Goucher II students, who are exempt from this requirement.

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The Major

Completion of a major is a requirement for the degree. Students are required to declare a major in the second semester of the sophomore year and may choose a major earlier if they are certain of their academic focus. The major enables students to study one or more disciplines in depth. No course may be counted toward requirements for the major unless a grade of C- or higher is earned. Courses elected with a pass/no pass option will not count toward requirements for the major unless such courses are graded on a pass/no pass option only.

Students must complete a writing requirement in the major and fulfill the requirements for the major, minor, or concentration that are in effect at the time they declare.

A student’s major may be designated in any of the following patterns:

PROGRAM MAJOR

The student follows a program with at least 36 credit hours of which at least 15 credit hours must be at the 300- or 400-level.

DOUBLE MAJOR

The student fulfills all the requirements for the major in two programs. 

The Minor

Students may select a program minor or interdisciplinary minor in addition to the major. The program minor shall require at least 20 credits of which as least 4 credits are at the 300- or 400-level. Programs are encouraged to list a core for the minor; at least 50 percent of the courses should be core. No course may be counted toward the requirements for a minor unless a grade of C- or higher is earned. Courses elected with a pass/no pass option will not count toward requirements for the minor unless such courses are graded on a pass/no pass option only. Students must complete the requirements for the minor that are in effect at the time when they declare.

The Concentration

Students may select a program or interdisciplinary concentration in addition to the major and must meet all the criteria for the concentration. Concentrations are not available in all programs or disciplines. As with the major and minor, no course may be counted toward the requirements for a concentration unless a grade of C- or higher is earned. Courses elected with a pass/no pass option will not count toward requirements for the concentration unless such courses are graded on a pass/no pass option only.

Other Academic Opportunities

Independent Work

With the permission of the instructor and the department chair, a degree candidate may pursue independent study beginning with the second semester of the first year. Ordinarily, a student may not register for more than two independent studies per semester. No more than 16 credits of independent study may be applied toward the 120 credits required for graduation. Also, the Senior Thesis is considered as independent work and therefore is counted as part of the 16-credit maximum applied to the 120 credits required for graduation. The independent work form is the same as the course change (add/drop) form.

The Senior Thesis

The senior thesis is the product of scholarly or scientific research or artistic work of high academic quality. The character of the work leading to the senior thesis is expected to be more advanced than normal course work and should involve an unusually high level of initiative, independence, organization, and effort. It is used by many programs as one criterion for selecting students who are awarded honors in the major. The thesis is also part of the scholarly record of the College. Senior thesis work carries eight credits and involves two sequential courses of four semester credit hours each, directed by a faculty advisor selected by the student. The advisor and the thesis subject are in the student’s major field. Students must present a proposal for a senior thesis during their junior year. They will qualify to register for senior thesis work after completion of a minimum of 87 semester hours of college credit. Students must have a minimum GPA of 3.50 in the major field(s) and 3.25 overall. They should also be making normal progress toward completion of all requirements in the major(s). When a student is double majoring and both programs require a thesis for honors, it is up to each program whether one thesis will be allowed to count toward both honors. Also, the Senior Thesis is considered as independent work and therefore is counted as part of the 16-credit maximum applied to the 120 credits required for graduation.

Academic Internships

Earning Credit

Earning credit for internships is an important and valuable learning opportunity for all students and is required for some majors. Each department has established internship courses with distinct prerequisites and academic requirements. All internships must adhere to the policies outlined by the College.

Internship Policies

The following policies have been established to clarify how students are awarded credit and to address issues relating to registration for internship credit. These guidelines have been developed to provide a framework for the internship process and to clearly delineate the roles and expectations for all involved in the internship program:

1.   Students must work 45 hours at the internship for every one academic credit.

2.   Students may earn a total of eight (8) internship credits toward graduation. Students participating in more than eight internship credits will not be able to apply additional credits towards graduation.

3.   Credit can be awarded only when the internship experience coincides with the semester that the student registers for such credit.

4.   Students may complete only one (1) internship per semester (up to four credits), including summer.

5.   Students may complete more than one internship at a site, but the responsibilities and academic work involved in the internship must be different in order for additional credit to be earned.

6.   Students may take an academic internship course for zero-credits.

7.   Students must complete a reflection document about their internship experience at the end of each semester and return it to the CEO by the deadline.

8.   A student’s internship site supervisor and faculty internship sponsor must be different people.

9.   The faculty internship sponsor must be from the academic department in which the internship credit will be awarded.

Internship courses will be available for variable credit, with 45 hours required for every one credit. Programs can elect to offer courses between 0-4. Please see the descriptions in the academic catalogue to determine prerequisites, requirements, and credit options for each course.

Students can register for an internship course for zero-credits, which will be recorded on the academic transcript. Please note that a zero-credits internship course does not satisfy any major/minor or study abroad requirements.

Students must take an active role in arranging their internship and are encouraged to utilize the resources provided by the CEO.  The CEO supports students by helping them locate opportunities, research organizations, develop their resume and cover letters, prepare for interviews, and negotiate offers with employers.

Additional Internship Information:

  • Internship Accelerator: Part of the Goucher’s Edge, this four-year sequence of real-world workplace experiences that will help students clarify where they’re headed after graduation and cultivate the knowledge, skills, and networks needed to get there.  Two specific programs are:
    • Goucher Intern Fellowship: financial support to students completing unpaid internship in the summer.
    • Micro-Internships: virtual, paid, project-based experience offer during winter break and hosted by Goucher alumnae/i
  • International Internships:  students may expand their knowledge and understand of unique cultures and people during an international work experience. 

Endowed Internships

The following funds are part of the Goucher Intern Fellowship program which provide support to students completing summer internships. Students must submit an application for the fellowships to the Career Education Office by the deadline posted on the CEO website.

The Betty McLeod Ariosa Internship Award is awarded to students who are pursuing internships in the public and private business sectors.

The Elizabeth Statuta Baker ‘70 and Edward Keefer Baker Internship Fund was established to support internship experiences for one or more students at Goucher College.  Preference will be given to students who intern with a nonprofit organization and/or are pursuing a career in public service. 

The Bank of Baltimore Internship Award is awarded to students who are pursuing internships in any field. 

The Peter W. Bardaglio Intern Fellowship was established to honor professor and mentor, Peter W. Bardaglio, to provide financial support for internship experiences for students enrolled in the undergraduate program at Goucher College.

The Jeanne V. Beekhuis Student Internship Fund was established to develop programs and services dedicated to channeling the talents and experience of Goucher alumnae/i into valuable career resources for Goucher students, and to help offset the expenses of students pursuing internships.

The Lucile Vanden Brink Internship is awarded to students who are pursuing an internship opportunity in visual, graphic, literary or performance arts with a preference for those students pursuing work in the medium of pottery.

The Class of ‘77 Goucher Intern Fellowship was established to support internship experiences for students enrolled in the undergraduate program at Goucher College.

The Marjorie Cook Foundation Internship Fund was established to support domestic internship experiences for one or more students at Goucher College. The internships shall be with organizations that work to further the Foundation’s mission, which is to expand the equality of women under the law.

The Brownlee Corrin Internship Award is awarded to students pursuing internships during the summer or winter, with special consideration to students majoring in political science, international relations and communication.

The Mary Ross Flowers Internship Fund is awarded to students doing internships in the general areas of conservation of natural resources including flora and fauna.

The Judith Miller Kosloff Class of 1939 Internship Award is given to a student interning with a non-profit organization.

The Elaine G. Messer Memorial Internship Award is awarded to students engaged in business or corporate internships.

The Sally J. Michel ‘60 Fund for Internships in Community Service is awarded to a student, from any major field of study, who has proposed a meaningful internship experience with an existing organization or through a student-initiated program that is dedicated to responding to the unmet needs in the community through direct service or social action.

The Judy Jolley Mohraz Fund for Internships in Community Service was established to be the college’s foremost award for student excellence in community service.  To be eligible, students must propose to engage in an internship experience with an organization that provides, coordinates or encourages community activism and service.

The Leona Sarah Morris ‘35 Endowed Internship Fund is awarded to Goucher students who are enrolled in the college’s undergraduate program and are pursuing internships.  Preference will be given to students with strong academic standing who are actively pursuing internships in nonprofit or for-profit organizations with a preference given to internships in media relations, communications, journalism, and/or public affairs.

The Earl L. and Christine Bikle Mummert ‘67 Award Fund is awarded to one or more Goucher undergraduates to provide funding for an internship with a non-profit organization.  Preference will be given to internships with organizations whose mission is to promote world peace.

The Naidoff Internship Award in Politics and Public Policy is awarded to junior and senior students who intend to pursue a career in government, politics, public policy, public interest, law or related fields. Preference is given to students who have formally declared their intention to major in politics and public policy.

The Professor Mary Carman Rose Endowed Internship Fund is awarded to students who are pursuing an internship during the summer months while an undergraduate at Goucher College. Students will be selected through a competitive process with preference for students involved in the pursuit of research, knowledge, and/or professional experience within the humanities, arts, and natural sciences.

The Jean Flah Silber ‘54 Fund for Internships in Government and Public Policy is awarded to junior or senior students who engage in internships within the United States in the subject area of government and public policy.

The Helen Fisher Solomon ‘44 Internship Fund is awarded to students who are pursuing an internship in the non-profit sector

The Carol Weinberg Endowed Internship Fund in Community is awarded to students with strong academic standing who are actively pursuing internships in nonprofit organizations with a preference given to those students who plan to pursue a career in the nonprofit sector.

The Robert S. Welch Endowed Internship Fund in Environmental Sustainability is awarded to students who plan to pursue careers focusing on ecology and/or support for the environment.  Applicants must be actively pursuing internships that focus on ecology and/or support for the environment, with preference given for internships in nonprofit organizations. 

The Zuckerberg Internship Award is awarded to support for one or more students at Goucher College who perform an internship during their course of study.

Goucher Prison Education Partnership (GPEP) and Writing Workshops at the Baltimore County Detention Center 

The Goucher Prison Education Partnership (GPEP) is an extension of Goucher College. Our primary goal is to offer an excellent college education to men and women incarcerated in Maryland. We operate on-site higher education programs in two state prisons, offering courses from the Goucher College catalog for students to pursue a BA from Goucher with a major in American Studies. We also offer a suite of college preparatory courses to prepare students for the rigorous college courses for which Goucher is known. While we are a division of Goucher College, all courses at the prisons are funded 75% by individual donations and private grants and 25% by federal Pell grants. We rely heavily on volunteers from the campus and the surrounding community. This funding model and volunteer support allow GPEP to offer a full scholarship to all Goucher students enrolled on the campuses in the prisons.

Courses are taught by Goucher faculty and faculty from surrounding colleges. Goucher faculty and upperclassmen serve as tutors for the Goucher students incarcerated at the prisons. Students from the main campus also engage with GPEP as research assistants (serving as a bridge between the academic library on the main campus and the students at the prison), administrative assistants (assisting with programmatic projects and clerical work), as supplemental instructors, or as academic hotline monitors.

To learn more about GPEP, including hearing from current students and alumni, and more information about how to get involved, visit our website (hyperlink to www.goucher.edu/gpep) and follow us on Instagram and Facebook @GPEP.Goucher

Graduate Credits

Accelerated Bachelor of Arts/Masters Degree Programs

Goucher’s Graduate and Professional Studies offers accelerated degree programs (sometimes referred to as 4+1) in which students can earn both a Bachelor of Arts degree and a Master’s degree in roughly five years in Cultural Sustainability, Education, and Environmental Sustainability & Management.

Through these programs, students who have at least a 3.0 grade point average and who have attained junior status may take up to 15 graduate credits while they are still undergraduate students. These 15 graduate credits apply to the 120 credits required for the Bachelor’s degree, as well as to the credits required for the Master’s degree. The accelerated programs typically require two to three summers of coursework. Information on the programs is available at the relevant program website at: http://www.goucher.edu/graduate-programs

Besides the accelerated programs offered through Goucher’s Graduate and Professional Studies, students have access to accelerated programs through partnerships with other colleges and universities.  Information on these programs and their admission requirements are available at:https://www.goucher.edu/learn/academic-partnerships/.

Baltimore Student Exchange Program/Interinstitutional Programs

The Baltimore Student Exchange (BSEP) Program allows qualified students at Goucher to take undergraduate courses offered at other participating colleges in the area. The student’s credits and grades from the host institution are automatically transferred to Goucher at the end of the term during which the course was taken. For more information visit: https://www.goucher.edu/registrar/baltimore-student-exchange-program

Transfer Work after Students have begun at Goucher

Students who wish to obtain credit for work taken at another institution after they have started at Goucher must have their course elections approved by their advisors and the College Registrar, acting on behalf of the Provost. They must fill out a Transfer Course Approval form prior to taking a course elsewhere. The form can be found at this link: https://www.goucher.edu/registrar/documents/Transfer-Course-Approval-Form.pdf. If the course requested is from a program other than that of the advisor, and the course is not similar in context to a listed Goucher course the approval of that program is required. Only courses with grades of C- or higher will be accepted. Transfer courses do not affect student’s GPA.

Advanced Placement (AP) Credits

Goucher College recognizes AP exam score results of 4-5. Official AP scores must be sent directly from the College Board to Goucher (code 5257) before credit may be applied toward a program of study. The chart below indicates the various courses and associated scores required to receive credit at Goucher, as well as any courses and Goucher Commons requirements satisfied by the AP coursework. For additional information on Goucher’s curriculum, please review the section on Goucher Commons Requirements.

Academic Area

AP Examination

AP Grade

Goucher Credits

Course Exemption

Notes

Art

History of Art

4 or 5

4

None

 

Studio Art

 

-

-

See notes.

Students can request a portfolio review from the Art Program.

 

2D Design

4 or 5

4

ART 102

 

 

3D Design

4 or 5

4

ART 127

 

 

Drawing

4 or 5

4

ART 114

 

Biology

Biology

4 or 5

4

 

Consult BIO or BCMB program coordinator for placement.

Chemistry

Chemistry

5

8

 

Consult CHE program coordinator for placement.

Chemistry

4

4

CHE 111 

Placement into CHE 151.

Computer Science

Computer Science A

4 or 5

4

CS 116 

Places into CS 119 

Computer Science Principles

4 or 5

4

None

See program for placement.

Economics

Macroeconomics

4 or 5

4

EC 111 

Credit for EC 111 and EC 211 with a 4 or 5 on both AP Macroeconomics and AP Microeconomics exams.

Microeconomics

4 or 5

4

EC 111 

Credit for EC 111 and EC 211 with a 4 or 5 on both AP Macroeconomics and AP Microeconomics exams.

English

 

 

 

Eng. Literature and Composition

4 or 5

4

None

 

Eng. Language and Composition

4 or 5

 

4

 

 

 

Exemption comes only from writing placement exam.

Environmental Science

Environmental Science

4 or 5

4

ES 100 

Fulfills GCR-ES.

History
 

US History

4 or 5

4

None

Students who become majors may be exempt from relevant history courses and satisfy appropriate 100-level departmental requirements, but no credit given for particular courses.

European

4 or 5

4

None

See above.

World

4 or 5

4

None

See above.

Human Geography

Human Geography

4 or 5

4

None

 

Languages

French Language

4 or 5

4

See program director to determine placement.

GCR-FL may be fulfilled after student’s language is assessed by the Modern Language faculty. 

 

French Literature

4 or 5

4

None

 

 

German Language

4 or 5

4

See program director to determine Placement.

GCR-FL may be fulfilled after student’s language is assessed by the Modern Language faculty.

 

Latin: Vergil

4 or 5

4

 

 

 

Latin Literature

4 or 5

4

 

 

 

Spanish Language

4 or 5

4

See program director to determine placement.

GCR-FL may be fulfillled after student’s language is assessed by the Hispanic Languages faculty. 

 

Spanish Literature

4 or 5

4

 

 

 

Italian Language and Culture

4 or 5

4

See program to determine placement.

GCR-FL may be fulfilled after student’s language is assessed by the Modern Language faculty. 

Mathematics
 
 

Calculus AB

4 or 5

4

DMC 172

Does not fulfill GCR - Data Analytics - Foundation (DAF)

Calculus BC

4 or 5

8

DMC 172

Does not fulfill GCR - Data Analytics - Foundation (DAF)

Calculus AB & BC

4 or 5

8

DMC 172

Does not fulfill GCR - Data Analytics - Foundation (DAF)

Statistics

4 or 5

4

EC 206, DMC 106 or MA 140

Fulfills GCR - Data Analytics - Foundation (DAF)

Music

Theory

4 or 5

4

See program director to determine placement.

 

Listening & Literature

4 or 5

4

 

 

Political Science

US Government & Politics

4 or 5

4

See program director to determine placement.

 

Comparative Government &
Politics

5

4

See program director to determine placement.

 

Physics
 

Physics 1, or Physics 2

4 or 5

4

See program director to determine placement.

Physics 1 = PHY 115. Physics 2 = PHY 116.

C: Mechanics

4 or 5

4

See program director to determine placement.

 

C: Elec & Magnetism

4 or 5

4

See program director to determine placement.

 

Psychology

Psychology

4 or 5

4

PSY 105 

 

 

Pre-college Coursework and Examinations

Official copies of Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, French Baccalaureate, German Arbitur, or the General Certificate of Education A-level test scores may be submitted to Goucher for first-time post-secondary credit and/or placement consideration. Evaluation and awarding of credit will be completed by the College Registrar and the appropriate academic faculty.

International Baccalaureate (IB)

Goucher College may award credit and/or placement for higher level (HL) IB exams with grades of 5-7, and in some cases, standard level (SL) IB exams with grades of 5-7. See the following link for individual IB course credit equivalencies: IB Course Equivalency Credit 

French Baccalaureate

If a student has earned the French Baccalaureate, one year of credit (30 semester hours) will be recognized provided no grade is below 10 and all subjects are appropriate to Goucher’s curriculum. For each subject with a grade below 10 or for each subject not appropriate to Goucher’s curriculum, six semester hours of credit will be deducted. If a student failed the French Baccalaureate or completed course work through the First or Premiere level, six semester hours of credit will be recognized provided a grade of 10 or better has been achieved on the French examination.

German Abitur

Students with the German Abitur may be awarded credit for examination scores of 10 or higher (15-point scale). Evaluation of actual credit will be determined by the College Registrar and the appropriate academic department.

General Certificate of Education A-Level

Individual courses will be reviewed by the College Registrar and appropriate academic representatives for possible transfer credit.

Air Force ROTC

Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps (AFROTC) is available to Goucher students through a (cross-town agreement) agreement with the University of Maryland College Park (UMCP). AFROTC courses are scheduled so students from Goucher may complete all AFROTC requirements during one morning (Thursday) per week at the College Park campus. In addition, students are eligible to compete for all AFROTC scholarship programs. The three-year and two-year scholarships pay tuition, books, and a monthly stipend while in school. Students must maintain a 2.0 GPA to participate in the program and a 2.5 GPA if on ROTC scholarship. You must have at least 5 semesters of college remaining and must be under age 31 when you commission. After graduation and successful completion of AFROTC requirements, students are commissioned as second lieutenants in the Air Force. Students interested in AFROTC should visit the detachment website: (http://www.afrotc.umd.edu/), call at 301-314-3242, or visit in person at:

AFROTC Detachment 330
University of Maryland
Cole Field House
2126 Campus Drive
College Park, MD 20742-4321

Army ROTC

Goucher accepts Army ROTC Scholarships as part of the college’s association with the Army ROTC program at Loyola College. Interested students should contact the Loyola College ROTC program at https://www.loyola.edu/academics/rotc.

3+2 Dual Degree in Engineering with Columbia University

Goucher College has established a dual-degree program (typically called a “3+2” program) in partnership with Columbia University in the City of New York. The dual-degree program enables students to explore the liberal arts and sciences, while developing professional knowledge and experience in a specific field of engineering. Students in the program are admitted initially by Goucher College, where they will typically spend three years fulfilling liberal education requirements and completing major requirements for the B.A. degree.  Although in principle students can pursue any major at Goucher, the required prerequisite courses in math, programming, and sciences are mostly included in Goucher’s Engineering Science major, making it an effective choice.

Successful students who have met the necessary requirements will then apply to complete an additional two years at the partner institution to complete a B.S. degree in engineering.  At the Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science of Columbia University, students can earn degrees in Applied Physics, Biomedical Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, Earth and Environmental Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management Systems, Industrial Engineering, Engineering Mechanics, Materials Science and Engineering, and Mechanical Engineering.  

Below is a brief explanation of each engineering field.

  • Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics focus on applications derived from fundamental physical and mathematical principles. Examples include nanoscale engineering, optical devices, and space science.
  • Electrical and Computer Engineering include the fields of communications, control systems, electronics, and digital systems.
  • Chemical Engineering relies upon the laws of chemistry, physics, and mathematics to change the structure of chemical substances and purify new substances that are created in the process.
  • Biomedical Engineering is dedicated to solving problems and generating products through molecular scale biochemical and biological transformations, leading to the design of novel biological products and processes for medicine.
  • Civil Engineering reflects the breadth of the engineering disciplines in the planning and designing of buildings, bridges, transportation systems, and environmental programs.
  • Environmental Engineering deals with the amelioration of environmental problems.
  • Materials Science and Engineering is concerned with the structure, properties, performance, processing, and production of all materials, including biomaterials.
  • Mechanical Engineering deals with the manipulation of energy through useful mechanical devices, including biomechanical devices.

Both the B.A. degree from Goucher College and the B.S. degree from Columbia are awarded at the conclusion of the fifth year, provided all requirements for each degree have been fulfilled. It is also possible to participate in the dual-degree program on a 4+2 basis, i.e., to transfer to Columbia after 4 years at Goucher. Interested students should contact the Engineering Science program chair, Dr. Rodney Yoder. 

For purposes such as payment of tuition, student governance, financial aid, and housing, participants in the 3+2 program are considered Goucher students during their first three years, and Columbia students during the last two.

Coursework and Requirements

During the three years at Goucher, student must take all required science and mathematics foundational courses (listed below) as well as specific pre-engineering courses for the engineering major of interest (listed below).  Students then apply for transfer to Columbia during the junior year; admission is likely (though not guaranteed) if a student successfully meets all of the following requirements:

  • Full-time enrollment at Goucher College for at least past two years.
  • Minimum overall GPA of 3.30, inclusive of all coursework taken for credit.
  • Minimum pre-engineering GPA of 3.30, inclusive of all science and mathematics prerequisite coursework.  Additionally, a minimum grade of B (3.0) must be obtained on the first attempt in all science and mathematics prerequisite coursework.
  • Successful completion of major-specific prerequisite coursework by the end of the spring semester of application
  • Successful completion of the degree and major requirements (with the exception of the 120-credit total) at Goucher College by the end of the spring semester of application.
  • Favorable recommendation letters: one each from the 3+2 Dual Degree coordinator at Goucher College, a science instructor and a math instructor.
  • Demonstrated proficiency in English.

Required prerequisite courses must be taken in person, not online, except during the 2020-21 academic year. 

The required foundational courses for all 3+2 engineering majors transferring to Columbia University are:

  • PHY 125 - General Physics I (4 Cr.) 
  • PHY 126 - General Physics II (4 Cr.) 
  • CHE 111 - Principles of Chemistry I with Lab (4 Cr.) 
  • CS 119 - Foundations of Computer Science (4 Cr.) 
  • EC 111 - Essentials of Economics I (4 Cr.) 
  • EC 211 - Essentials of Economics II (4 Cr.) 
  • DMC 172 - Calculus through Data and Modeling (4 Cr.) 
  • 27 non-technical Humanities and Social Sciences credit hours (includes EC 111 and EC211 and college writing proficiency courses)
  • Two additional semesters of calculus must be taken at another institution, preferably a Baltimore Student Exchange Program (BSEP) member school

Additional courses are required for each of the engineering fields, as follows:

Applied Physics or Applied Mathematics

  • PHY 325 - Classical and Quantum Waves (4 Cr.)
  • A course in ordinary differential equations, taken independently or at another institution

Biomedical Engineering

  • PHY 325 - Classical and Quantum Waves (4 Cr.)
  • DMC 416 - Scientific Computation (4 Cr.)
  • CHE 151 - Principles of Chemistry II with Lab (4 Cr.) 
  • BIO 111 - Explorations in Biology I: The Research Process (4 Cr.) 
  • BIO 112 - Explorations in Biology II: Life in Context (4 Cr.) 
  • Python programming experience required

Chemical Engineering

  • DMC 416 - Scientific Computation (4 Cr.)
  • CHE 151 - Principles of Chemistry II with Lab (4 Cr.) 
  • CHE 230 - Organic Chemistry I with Lab (4 Cr.) 
  • Python programming experience recommended

Civil Engineering

  • DMC 416 - Scientific Computation (4 Cr.)
  • ES 200 - Environmental Geology (4 Cr.) 
  • Python programming experience recommended

Computer Engineering

  • CS 330 - Analysis of Computer Algorithms (4 Cr.) 
  • CS 350 - Theory of Computation (4 Cr.) 
  • DMC 416 - Scientific Computation (4 Cr.)
  • Java programming experience required
  • An introduction to electrical engineering course must be taken at another institution

Earth & Environmental Engineering

  • CHE 151 - Principles of Chemistry II with Lab (4 Cr.) 
  • DMC 416 - Scientific Computation (4 Cr.)

One of the following three:

  • BIO 112 - Explorations in Biology - The Research Process (4 Cr.)
  • PHY 325 - Classical and Quantum Waves (4 Cr.)
  • CHE 230 - Organic Chemistry I with Lab (4 Cr.) 

Electrical Engineering

  • DMC 416 - Scientific Computation (4 Cr.)
  • PHY 325 - Classical and Quantum Waves (4 Cr.)
  • Sufficient knowledge of computer programming in C++ or Java is needed in order to take Data Structures (COMS W3134 or W3137) at Columbia University
  • An introduction to electrical engineering course must be taken at another institution

Industrial Engineering, Engineering Management Systems or Operations Research

  • DMC 321 - Applied Linear Algebra (4 Cr.)
  • DMC 240 - Probability and Statistics (4 Cr.) 
  • DMC 301 - Foundations of Data Science (4 Cr.)
  • CS 330 - Analysis of Computer Algorithms (4 Cr.) 
  • CS 350 - Theory of Computation (4 Cr.)

Engineering Mechanics

  • DMC 416 - Scientific Computation (4 Cr.)
  • Python programming experience recommended

Materials Science & Engineering

  • CHE 151 - Principles of Chemistry II with Lab (4 Cr.) is recommended
  • DMC 416 - Scientific Computation (4 Cr.)
  • PHY 325 - Classical and Quantum Waves (4 Cr.)
  • Python programming experience recommended

Mechanical Engineering

  • DMC 301 - Foundations of Data Science (4 Cr.)
  • DMC 416 - Scientific Computation (4 Cr.)
  • BIO 111 - Explorations in Biology I or PHY 325 - Classical and Quantum Waves 

Academic Procedures

Commencement

Commencement exercises are held once a year in May. In order to participate, a student must have completed 120 credits, all academic requirements, including GCRs and major requirements, and have settled all college accounts and all student disciplinary matters. A student who is in good academic standing (cumulative GPA of at least 2.0) and is within four credits of completing graduation requirements may participate in commencement exercises only if documentation demonstrates that the remaining credits will be completed by the August degree date of that year. Petitions for exceptions are only accepted from students who have been enrolled in the spring for all remaining courses needed for participation in commencement exercises, and for whom unforeseen and unpreventable forces at the end of the semester are the cause of the failure to complete those courses. Permission for students finishing in the summer to participate in the May Commencement must be granted by the Associate Provost for Undergraduate Studies in consultation with faculty advisors. Students must submit a petition, with documentation, to the Associate Provost at least three weeks prior to Commencement: https://ranger.goucher.edu/gcswa/stugradpetition.aspx.

The College reserves the right to not permit the release of a cap and gown to any student who has not been cleared for graduation. Students completing graduation requirements in the summer will be awarded their degree in late August, and students completing requirements in the Fall will be awarded their degree in December.

Academic Responsibilities

In fulfilling their academic responsibilities, students are granted a degree of autonomy commensurate with their obligations to Goucher’s social and academic communities. Students’ academic obligations and responsibilities include regular class attendance and systematic preparation in all phases of their work.

Any student who must be absent from class for a disproportionate amount of time due to a personal reason (illness, injury, life-threatening illness or death in the immediate family, etc.) may be advised to withdraw from class and the College. Please refer to Goucher´s leave of absence and withdrawal policies (https://www.goucher.edu/registrar/leave-of-absence-withdrawal-from-the-college/), particularly the Medical/Compassionate Leave Policy, for the procedure to follow in these cases.  The Office of the Registrar receives and processes requests for withdrawal and leave under these policies. A student seeking to withdraw from the College for medical reasons must submit a written Semester Withdrawal Form and Health Care Provider Release Form to the Office of Student Support and Outreach or the Office of the Dean of Students. In some cases, students may also be involuntarily withdrawn from the College if necessary. See Involuntary Medical Withdrawals.

If a student is involved in a conduct case, the student should refer to the Sudent Code of Conduct (https://www.goucher.edu/registrar/leave-of-absence-withdrawal-from-the-college/college-initiated-administrative-withdrawal) which permits the President, the Provost, or the Dean of Students to require the student to leave the campus pending the outcome of the proceeding, or (if no proceeding is pending or anticipated) during such period as the President, Provost, or Dean of Students may determine.  A student who is required to leave campus should contact the Associate Director of Student Accountability and Education.

Academic Honor Code

The cornerstone of Goucher’s academic community is the Academic Honor Code. Adopted in the first decade of the 20th century, the code emphasizes the importance of personal honor and moral integrity that reflect the honor and integrity of the Goucher community. As the primary authority to regulate student conduct in matters pertaining to the Academic Honor Code, the Student Government Association provides for the Academic Honor Board. See full policy for the Academic Honor Code at https://www.goucher.edu/learn/provost/academic-honor-code and the Student Code of Conduct at https://www.goucher.edu/policies/student-code-of-conduct/.  They can also be found in the Campus Handbook. The Associate Provost for Undergraduate Studies may be consulted for information about the Academic Honor Board process.

Academic Progress Toward a Degree

(*Note this may be different than the Financial Aid Regulations regarding academic progress.)

Students are expected to continue to make satisfactory academic progress towards a degree each term. Full-time students are expected to achieve this through the cumulative GPA requirements and Successful Credit Load. Both are described below.

GPA Standards:

At the end of each semester, the Associate Provost for Undergraduate Studies reviews the records of all students. The table above sets the minimum GPA standards set by the Academic Policies Committee. Credits attempted include all transfer credits accepted by Goucher. GPAs listed in the table are based on Goucher work only.

Credits Attempted

0-27

28-57

58 and up

Minimum GPA to remain in good standing

2.0*

2.0

2.0

Minimum GPA to remain at Goucher

1.6

1.7

1.8

       

*For first-semester first-year students only, the GPA to remain in good standing is 1.8.

As part of the continuing guidance offered to each Goucher student, the Associate Provost for Undergraduate Studies, in consultation with APC, reviews and acts on the record of any student who does not meet the standards outlined above or who meets the standards but whose work shows a marked negative trend. This includes, but is not limited to, students earning one or more “F/FW” grades, one or more “NP” grades, or any combination of two or more “D”, “I”, or “W” grades in a single semester.  The review includes an assessment of each student’s academic achievement and an evaluation of extenuating circumstances and of the student’s potential for substantial academic improvement. This review determines the student’s academic standing.

The Associate Provost for Undergraduate Studies may place a student on academic warning, probation, or suspension, or may dismiss the student from the College. The College reserves the right to suspend or dismiss students who do not pass any courses in their first semester.

A student who is placed on academic probation may not hold any elected or appointed office in any college organization, participate in any varsity sport (with the exception of supervised on-campus training and practice sessions), or register for more than 16 credit hours in a semester.  All students placed on academic probation are required to enroll in a 2-credit Learn-to-Learn course the following semester. In this course, students learn essential skills for success in college and apply what they learn to other classes.  Students do not incur additional cost for this course.  This course allows students to attain good academic standing sooner, as it is credit-bearing.  Probationary students who meet the requirements and make progress towards the goals return to good academic standing. Students who still fall below the requirements for good academic standing are placed on probation for one additional semester.  Students who fail to regain good academic standing after two consecutive probationary semesters may face suspension.

A student who has been suspended may apply for reinstatement following the completion of a minimum 12 credit hours, excluding summer and winter school, at an accredited academic institution with no grade lower than a C-, or one year of successful work experience with a letter from the employer stating the dates of employment. A student who has been dismissed may not return to the College.

If a student holds an office in Student Government or is a varsity athlete or believes they should not be placed on probation or suspended, the student may write an appeal to the chair of APC and must present an academic plan of success for the remaining semesters at Goucher.  Strong letters will focus on the aspects of the situation that were within the student’s control and identify concrete and specific steps they will take to ensure satisfactory academic performance in future semesters.  In the case of suspended students, the letter should also indicate what the student has done during their time away from school to prepare for a successful re-enrollment.  The decision of the committee will be final.  If it is agreed that the plan is feasible, the student will be required to adhere to the plan for all remaining semesters.

Students are cautioned that they should be averaging 15 credits a semester if they plan on reaching the 120-credit minimum required for the BA degree in 4 years (i.e. 8 semesters x 15 credits = 120 credits).

Successful Credit Load Standards

Once a student has completed two full terms at Goucher College their academic record will be reviewed with emphasis toward successful completion. The table below sets the minimum standards set by the Academic Policies Committee. Credits attempted include all transfer credits accepted by Goucher.

After 2 terms a full-time student must have successfully completed 24 credits at Goucher.

After 4 terms a full-time student must have successfully completed 54 credits at Goucher.

After 6 terms a full-time student must have successfully completed 87 credits at Goucher.

Note that attempted credits are not credits successfully completed. All courses that have NP, W or F/FW are considered as attempted credits.

Calculation of the GPA 

Only courses completed at Goucher, through the interinstitutional (BSEP) cross-registration program, or through a Goucher sponsored program, are included in the GPA calculation. Each semester, the credit hour value of each course attempted for a grade is multiplied by the numerical value of the earned grade to determine the quality points earned. The total number of quality points earned in these courses is divided by the total number of graded credit hours attempted resulting in the GPA for the semester.

The cumulative GPA is the cumulative total of the quality points earned in all courses divided by the total number of graded credit hours attempted. The semester GPAs are not averaged together to create the cumulative average. The numerical value of grades is as follows: A=4.0, A-=3.67, B+=3.33 B=3.0, B-=2.67, C+=2.33, C=2.0, C-=1.67, D+=1.33, D=1.0, D-=0.67, F/FW=0.0

The following is an example of how to calculate a GPA:

Grade Earned Numerical Value of Grade Earned   Credit Hours   Quality Points       GPA
A 4 x 3 = 12        
B 3 x 4 = 12        

      7   24 ÷ 7 = 3.43

Course Load

A full-time student may take between 12.0 and 18.0 credit hours in any semester.  However, students should average 15.0 credits per semester, in order to reach the 120.0 credits required for graduation within eight semesters. Students who elect fewer than 12.0 credit hours in a semester are considered to be part-time unless granted reduced course load status pursuant to Goucher’s Reduced Course Load Policy: https://www.goucher.edu/policies/reduced-course-load-policy.

  • Students who, due to extraordinary circumstances, are in need of a heavier course load than the aforementioned academic credit limit policy may petition the Associate Provost for Undergraduate Studies: https://ranger.goucher.edu/gcswa/StuCreditOverReq.aspx.
  • Students taking more than 18.0 credits per semester will be charged the part-time tuition rate for additional credits.
  • Goucher credits taken over the summer or winter terms will not count toward the semester credit limits. Students will be charged summer or winter term rates for credits taken during these terms.
  • Withdrawn courses count towards course load and tuition charges.

Audits

A full-time student may audit one or more courses a semester without additional charge. Election of the audit option must be done at the point of registration for the course or within the add/drop deadline for adding a course. Permission to audit must be obtained in writing from the instructor of each course. Successful completion of audits will result in an AU on the transcript. There will be no notation on the transcript in the case of unsuccessful completion or withdrawal from an audited course. Students may withdraw from an audit through the last day of classes. College policy prohibits changing an audit to credit or vice versa after the add/drop deadline. No petitions will be granted. Faculty may request a student’s withdrawal from an audit if the audit requirements are not met.

Withdrawals from Courses

A student may drop a semester course without a withdrawal appearing on the transcript until the tenth day of class. If a student withdraws from a class after this time, the student will receive a grade of W. The last day to withdraw from a semester-long or 7-week course with a W is the last day of class. 

Withdrawn courses count towards course load and tuition charges. A W will have no effect on a student’s grade point average nor on the student’s credit completion rate.

Students should consult the Important Dates for Students calendar for exact dates.

Add/Drop Deadlines for Courses

Students may add or drop any full semester course using the online registration system (“myGoucher”) during the open add/drop period, which ends on the fifth business day of the semester. Between the fifth and tenth business days of the semester, students may add or drop courses by submitting a course change form to the Office of the Registrar, but may add a course only with the permission of the instructor.  (Permission to add a course during this period is granted at the instructor’s discretion and is not automatic, as joining a class late can put a student at a significant disadvantage.) To add a course, the form must be approved by both the instructor and the student’s advisor; to drop a course, only the advisor’s signature is needed. Students may not add a full semester course after the tenth business day. 

A student may withdraw from a full semester course after the tenth business day of the semester and before the course withdrawal deadline (week 10); in that case the student will receive a grade of “W” for the course. This action does not change the enrollment status of a student, that is, a full-time student continues to be full-time. 

A 7-week course may be added through the first 3 days of the 7-week term without instructor permission. On days 4 and 5 of the 7-week term the instructor must give permission for the student to add the course. To add a course after day 5 of the 7-week term the student will need to petition for a late add, with the approval of the instructor, to the Associate Provost for Undergraduate Studies. A student may drop a 7-week course through the end of the 5th day of the 7-week term.

See the Important Dates for Students calendar for the actual dates in each term.

Pass/No Pass

Students may choose to take two courses per academic year on a pass/no pass basis. The pass/no pass option must be submitted to the Registrar’s Office by the last day of classes. Pass is equivalent to any grade from A through C- as normally interpreted at Goucher College. A grade of P or NP will have no effect on a student’s grade point average. Students who wish to switch from pass/no pass to graded status may do so up until the last day of class.  After that the choice is irrevocable.

BSEP courses and summer courses taken elsewhere are not ordinarily open to pass/no pass election. Center Directors may specify that an off-campus experience can be taken only on a pass/no pass basis; such a requirement is not part of the student’s pass/no pass quota.

Courses elected with a pass/no pass option will not count toward requirements in the major or minor (unless such courses are required to be so graded). If a major requirement is taken pass/no pass the department must require that the course be re-taken for a regular grade or identify an appropriate substitute.

Courses taken for a pass/no pass grade do not count as “graded credits” for Dean’s list purposes.

Determination of Rank

First-year, sophomore, junior, or senior rank is determined at the beginning of the fall and spring semesters. Rank is based on credits achieved as follows:

First-year: 0-26.99 credit hours
Sophomore: 27-56.99 credit hours
Junior: 57-86.99 credit hours
Senior: 87 or more credit hours

Grading System

The grading system at Goucher is as follows: A, excellent; B, good; C, satisfactory; D, poor; F, failing; FW, failed and didn’t withdraw; P, pass; NP, no pass; I, incomplete; AU, audit. The letter grades may be modified by plus or minus as follows: A-, B+, B-, C+, C-, D+, and D-.

Grade Distribution

A         93%-100%
A-        90%-92.99%
B+       87%- 89.99%
B         83% - 86.99%
B-        80%-82.99%
C+       77%- 79.99%
C         73% - 76.99%
C-        70%-72.99%
D+       67%- 69.99%
D         63% - 66.99%
D-        60%-62.99% 

The incomplete is deleted from the student’s record when the grade for the course is submitted. PW and NW refer to college writing proficiency grades. PW refers to passing college writing proficiency, and NW refers to not passing college writing proficiency. W is defined under withdrawals. AU is defined under audits.

Students may choose to take two courses per academic year on a pass/no pass basis. In the regular semester, the pass/ no pass option must be submitted to the Office of the Registrar in Student Administrative Services by the end of the tenth week of classes; in half-semester courses, by the end of the third week. Pass is equivalent to any grade from A through C- as normally interpreted at Goucher College. Students who wish to switch from pass/no pass to graded status may do so up until week 10 of the semester (week three of seven-week courses). After that the choice is irrevocable.

Courses elected with a pass/no pass option will not count toward requirements for the major or minor unless such courses are graded on a pass/no pass option only. A grade of P or NP will have no effect on a student’s grade point average.

Interinstitutional/BSEP courses and summer courses taken elsewhere are not ordinarily open to pass/no pass election. Department chairs may specify that an off-campus experience can be taken only on a pass/no pass basis; such a requirement is not part of the student’s pass/no pass quota. Courses elected with a pass/no pass option will not count toward requirements in the major or minor (unless such courses are required to be so graded). If a major requirement is taken pass/no pass, the department must require that the course be re-taken for a regular grade or identify an appropriate substitute.

The deadline for any grade changes is 12 months past the semester in which the grade was originally received.

Grade Appeal

The purpose of the Grade Appeal Policy is to establish a consistent procedure by which students may seek review of final grades assigned in undergraduate courses at Goucher College. Grades other than final course grades may not be appealed. The policy recognizes the right and responsibility of faculty members to exercise their professional judgment in evaluating academic performance and the right of students to have their academic performance judged in a fair and impartial manner.

Grounds for Appeal

The purpose of the Grade Appeal Policy is to establish a consistent procedure by which students may seek review of final grades assigned in undergraduate courses at Goucher College. Grades other than final course grades may not be appealed. The policy recognizes the right and responsibility of faculty members to exercise their professional judgment in evaluating academic performance and the right of students to have their academic performance judged in a fair and impartial manner.

A student may appeal a final course grade only on the grounds that

  1. the grade was assigned based on a miscalculation or clerical error;
  2. the grading standards for the course were not clearly articulated by the instructor, or the grade was assigned in a manner inconsistent with articulated standards;
  3. the grade was assigned on some basis other than performance in the course; or
  4. the grade was assigned in a manner other than that used for other students in the course. At all levels of review, the burden of demonstrating that a grade should be changed rests with the students.

The deadline for any grade changes is 12 months past the semester in which the grade was originally received.  See full policy at https://www.goucher.edu/policies/documents/Grade-Appeal-Policy.pdf.

Incomplete Grade Procedures

A semester officially ends at the close of the examination period. No course work will be accepted by a faculty member after this time unless an incomplete grade request has been submitted by the student and approved by the instructor by the last day of class.

Incomplete grades at Goucher College are given only for reasons beyond the student’s control, namely medical reasons, or death in family. In all instances, the student must complete the process for an incomplete by 5:00pm on the last day of classes of the term in which the course was taught. Incomplete grades are intended to apply to cases where the student has completed at least three-quarters (75%) of the work of the session with a C- or above. The instructor has the right to deny an application for an incomplete grade.

Students applying for an incomplete after the deadline due to an emergency must submit a petition. The Associate Provost will determine, in conversation with the instructor of the class, the eligibility of the application. All requests will be reviewed but may not be granted.

Resolution of Incompletes

The resolution of an incomplete is the responsibility of the student and the instructor. The student should have all work completed as soon as possible but no later than four weeks from the last day of the final experience of the term in which the course was taught. The student should submit papers, projects, and examinations directly to the instructor. The instructor shall send a grade to the Registrar´s Office via email at the end of the fourth week following the final experience (see important dates for faculty).

Repeated Courses

If a student repeats a course, all course iterations and grades will be listed on the transcript but only the credits from the most recent iteration and the highest grade will count towards the student’s GPA and total credits towards graduation. 

Academic departments decide if a student must repeat a course in the major if the grade was below C-, or if they will permit the student to substitute another course for the major. Any academic department may set a policy that majors may not retake more than two courses required for the major for which they received a less than satisfactory grade. 

This policy does not apply to withdrawals and does not include courses that may be repeated for credit as listed in this catalogue. 

Topics courses are an exception and are repeatable when offered for a different topic.

Assessment

Goucher has an ongoing program of assessment to evaluate the effectiveness of the College and to ensure that it is meeting its goal of providing a high quality education. The assessment program includes opinion surveys, interviews, and testing. Students are expected to participate in assessment activities throughout their time at Goucher.

Final Experiences/Examinations

Final experiences/examinations are given at the end of each semester. An unexcused absence from a final experience/examination is counted as a failure on the experience/examination. The semester officially ends at the close of the final experience/examination period. No course work is accepted after this time unless an incomplete grade has been authorized. Students are responsible for submitting examinations and other assigned work to the instructor when they are due.

Course Reflections

A comprehensive system of student reflections on course construction, student engagement, faculty instruction and support, and student learning is considered vital to the academic community. At the end of each course, students are expected to complete and return course reflections distributed by the Committee on Reappointment, Promotion, and Tenure.

Academic Support

Academic Advising

Curricular guidance in a student’s first and second years is offered by a success advisor who works with the student to develop an academic plan of study. When students declare majors/minors, they choose faculty advisors in their major/minor programs. The Associate Provost for Undergraduate Studies coordinates the advising process. All the information pertaining to the fulfillment of requirements for graduation is found in this catalogue. Ultimately, it is the students’ responsibility to monitor their progress toward the fulfillment of degree requirements. Students can track completion of their Goucher Commons Requirements (GCRs) by viewing their DegreeWorks report in their MyGoucher account.

Academic Center for Excellence

The Academic Center for Excellence (ACE) is the academic and advising support center that embraces the strengths of a liberal arts education’s holistic nature.  ACE assists students in maximizing their potential to flourish and succeed at Goucher and beyond.  It guides students in preparing for a life of inquiry, creativity, social responsibility, and personal and professional ethics and integrity.  ACE includes Academic Success Coaching, the Office of Accessibility Services, and Success Advising.  

Career Education Office

The Career Education Office (CEO) helps students discover and pursue careers that combine their interests, skills, and values.  The CEO offer programs and services to help students at all stages of the career planning process and encourages students to visit the office early and often during their time at Goucher. The CEO assists students with major and career exploration, student employment, internships, full-time employment, and graduate and professional school preparation.  Students can connect with the CEO through individual appointments, drop-in advising, or email (career@goucher.edu.) Additional information about the CEO services can be found online at www.goucher.edu/ceo.

Honors and Awards

Dean’s List

At the end of each semester, students who have demonstrated an exceptional level of academic achievement for that semester are named to the Dean’s List. The minimum grade point average for Dean’s List is as follows:

First-year: 3.80
Sophomores: 3.85
Juniors: 3.90
Seniors: 3.95

Full-time students must complete at least 12 graded credits in the fall or spring semester to be eligible. Part-time students are eligible for Dean’s list when they complete a total of at least 12 graded credits in the fall and spring of an academic year. Courses taken for a P/NP grade do not count as “graded credits” for Dean’s List purposes.

The Dean’s List is created one-to-two months after the end of the final-exam grading period for the fall and spring semesters. This timing allows for grade reporting, grade changes, the clearing of incomplete grades, and other end-of-semester actions.

The associate provost for undergraduate studies cannot calculate the term GPA of students with missing grades or grades in progress. It is a student’s responsibility to follow up with the associate provost for undergraduate studies at associateprovost@goucher.edu if a faculty member has requested a change of grade on their behalf which has made them eligible to be on the Dean’s List after it has been posted.

Honors at Graduation

A student may graduate having achieved one or more of two distinctions.

Honors in the Major

Honors in the major is designed to give recognition to outstanding work in the major. This designation is awarded on the recommendation of the faculty who have taught and supervised a student’s work in the major at the upper level. Requirements for honors in the major are determined by each program.

Latin Honors & Cords

Students who have taken at least 60 semester credit hours on a letter-grade basis at Goucher or as part of a Goucher sponsored study-abroad program may be awarded their degrees

  • summa cum laude with a grade point average of 3.9,
  • magna cum laude with a grade point average of 3.7 to 3.89, or
  • cum laude with a grade point average of 3.5 to 3.69.

Grade point averages are not rounded off for Latin honors. Transfer students may not be able to take courses pass/no pass and still qualify for Latin honors unless they take a minimum of 60 graded credits in residence excluding pass/no pass.

At Goucher no cords are given to graduating students for work that is either paid, graded or credit-bearing.  Cords are only given in a few programs linked to Academic Honor Societies and specific awards: Computer Science, History, Hispanic and Latinx, Psychology, Sociology, and Visual and Material Culture.  Graduating seniors are given cords or stoles in some Affinity Graduation Ceremonies.

Phi Beta Kappa

Goucher College, formerly the Woman’s College of Baltimore, was granted a charter by the Phi Beta Kappa national honor society in 1904 as the Beta of Maryland Chapter.

Students are eligible for election on the basis of academic standing and rules of eligibility established by the Senate of the Chapter. These rules stipulate a minimum grade point average of 3.5; in addition, no more than 10 percent of the credit hours completed ordinarily may be graded pass/no pass (courses that may not be taken for a grade do not count in the 10 percent). All college-level work is considered, but work done at Goucher is weighted more heavily. Achievements of these standards do not guarantee membership. Students must also demonstrate academic integrity, commitment to intellectual pursuits, and breadth within their academic program. The latter ordinarily requires a student to complete courses in each of the five divisions beyond those taken to satisfy the general education requirements.

Annual Prizes and Awards

The Action Research Prize is given to graduates whose action research study represents an exceptionally high level of achievement in research design, execution, data analysis, and writing.

The Corene Elaine Amoss ‘93 Memorial Prize is awarded to Goucher students who have established an outstanding academic record and who participated in more than one aspect of co-curricular student life at Goucher College.

The Alumni Prize for Excellence in Physics is awarded to a student who has distinguished him or herself through outstanding achievement in the field of physics, as demonstrated by a minimum GPA of 3.5 or higher in the major, and has displayed significant promise in independent research, as evidenced by publication in a scholarly journal or a presentation to the scientific community beyond campus borders.

The Alumnae/i Prize for Service in Physics is awarded each year to a student who has distinguished him or herself by exemplary service to the Physics program and greater community, both inside and beyond Goucher’s borders.

The Harold Anderson Fund was established to recognize researchers who specialize in cultural documentation, particularly those engaged with endangered folkways, and to support MACS students who are focusing on cultural documentation in their MACS capstones by providing funding for softward and/or equipment.

The Applestein-Sweren Book Collecting Prize is for personal collections of books and related ephemera. The competition encourages Goucher students to read for enjoyment, to develop personal libraries throughout their lives, and to appreciate the special qualities of printed or illustrated works.

The Marilyn Silverman Apter ‘41 Prize is awarded in memory of Marilyn Silverman Apter, class of 1941, to an outstanding rising senior who has achieved high academic honors, served the college, and shown outstanding leadership qualities.

The Master of Arts in Arts Administration/Jean Wilhelm Award is awarded in recognition of outstanding work to a graduate student in arts administration presenting the best major paper in a given year.

The Jean H. Baker Award in History supported by the Calvin Fund in History is presented to a graduating history major who demonstrated exceptional skill in historical analysis and thinking.

The Milly Bielaski 1903 Prize in Chemistry is presented to an outstanding junior chemistry major.

The Mary Hortop Bready ‘46 Prize for Social Service to Baltimore is awarded each year to a student that shows dedication and service to the Baltimore community.

The Dorothy E. Brody ‘35 Internship in Women’s Issues is awarded to a sophomore, junior or senior to help underwrite or offset the cost of an internship consisting of community service in an organization dedicated to improving the status and/or condition of women.

The Dorothy E. Brody ‘35 Prize for Achievement in Women’s Studies is awarded to a senior who has demonstrated academic excellence and/or produced outstanding scholarly work in women’s studies.

The Joan K. Burton Award in Sociology in honor of Joan K. Burton, beloved professor of Sociology who retired in 2012, recognizes a graduating senior who has demonstrated academic excellence, outstanding service to the program, and a commitment to social justice, qualities Professor Burton embodied during her tenure at Goucher.

The Calvin Prize in History is awarded to an outstanding senior history major.

The Class of 1960 Rhoda Dorsey Endowment for the Archives Award was established by the Class of ‘60 in honor of their 55th reunion to provide ongoing support for current programming and development of new initiatives that showcase Special Collections & Archives and further Goucher College’s academic mission.

The Campus Compact Newman Civic Fellowship supports students in their personal, professional and civic growth as the next generation of public problem solvers.

The Coaches’ Award is given annually to one or more senior athletes who have best represented Goucher throughout four years of competition.

The Clara W. Classen ‘25 Fund was established from the estate of Clara W. Claasen ‘25 and the fund supports students research in the sciences.

The Elizabeth Dean Special Education Award is given to a Masters of Arts in Teaching graduate who is earning certification in special education teaching.

The Eleanor Denoon ‘36 Poetry Prize is sponsored by the Kratz Center for Creative Writing in memory of its founding donor, Eleanor Denoon. It is given to Goucher undergraduates “for serious, sustained work in poetry.”

The Prize for Excellence in Psychology is presented to an accomplished graduating senior who demonstrates exceptionally high achievement in or out of the classroom, in research inquiry or application, by means of intellectual risk-taking and creative problem-solving. Special consideration is given to students who have shown unusual resourcefulness and imagination in the face of challenge.

The Distinguished Alumnus Award for the Master of Arts in Historic Preservation was established in 2014 and recognizes an alumna’s/alumnus’s contributions to the field of historic preservation since graduation. The recipient is nominated by Goucher M.A.H.P. faculty. The recipient also serves as a lecturer during the limited residency.

The Distinguished Scholar Award is awarded to sophomores who have demonstrated a very high level of academic achievement and whose commitment to experiential learning is effected in their research or special project proposal.

The Gladys M. Dorsey ‘26 Memorial Award is given annually to a senior foreign language major who has demonstrated proficiency in one or more foreign languages and has made a contribution of time and talent to Goucher College. Preference will be given to French majors.

The Rhoda M. Dorsey Award is presented to a student who represents sustained leadership, commitment, teamwork, ingenuity, and an ability to work with fellow students, staff and administration.

The George Brendan Dowell Award in Theatre is given to recognize the achievement and high standing of a graduating senior in the Theatre program.

The Gayle V. Economos ‘76 First Graduate in Communication and Media Studies Prize in honor of Dr. George and Mrs. Kassie Economos and Aspasia Kasida is awarded to a student in good standing in the undergraduate program at Goucher College and who has declared a major in the communication and media studies program.

The Mary Katherine Boone Ekin ‘40 Prize in Computer Science is awarded to a senior majoring in computer science who is considered to have an excellent grasp of both theoretical and applied aspects of the subject. The criteria for the award include high achievement in course work and the ability to interpret the concepts of computer science in creative and imaginative ways.

The Environmental Studies Prize Fund is awarded to a junior or senior environmental studies major with a 3.5 GPA or higher who has shown outstanding academic achievement.

The Neena Tolley Ewing ‘72 Memorial Award is intended to recognize the most outstanding member of Goucher’s equestrian riding program. This prize is awarded to an outstanding member of Goucher’s Equestrian Program who is judged to demonstrate the most outstanding leadership, scholarship, riding talent, and teamwork.

The Erin Felarca ‘05 Memorial Academic Achievement Award is awarded to a graduating senior from the Communication and Media Studies Program who has demonstrated excellence in academics and commitment to issues of diversity.

Lynn Toby Fisher ‘71 and John Lee Compton Prize Fund was established to provide awards to undergraduate students at Goucher College to enhance the student’s educational experience.

The Erin Felarca ‘05 Memorial Award for Travel Abroad based on both financial need and merit, is awarded to a student majoring in communication and media studies in his/her sophomore year who is planning a study abroad trip for the following (junior) academic year. The award will help finance an ICA or a semester abroad.

The Josephine E. Fiske Award is given annually to a non-senior female varsity athlete for service and leadership.

The Mary Ross Flowers ‘28 Award in Astronomy is given each year to a student of any major with the best project in astronomy.

The Friends of Goucher Dance Prize for Excellence in Track of Study is awarded to a graduating Dance major who has demonstrated excellence in his or her track of study.

The Friends of Goucher Dance Prize for Excellence in Leadership and Service is awarded to a graduating Dance major that has participated fully in program activities and has made a positive contribution to the Dance program.

The Friends of Goucher Dance Prize for Outstanding Achievement in the Major is awarded to a graduating dance major who participated fully in every aspect of the program, earned a cumulative GPA of 3.8 or higher in the major, pursued every opportunity for growth and development, and demonstrated professional commitment to the field of dance.

The Dr. Helen B. Funk Prize Fund is awarded to majors in the biological sciences who demonstrate achievement and potential in the fields of microbiology and/or immunology.

The Hilda Gabrilove ‘48 and Dr. Janice Gabrilove Dirzulaitis ‘73 Chemistry Prize is awarded for academic excellence in chemistry.

The Margaret Guccione Prize for Arts and Literature is a part of the Julia Rogers Research Prize that honors a paper in literature or arts and to honor Margaret’s long-standing role with the research prize.

The Dr. Helen Habermann Prize Fund is awarded to majors in the biological sciences who demonstrate achievement and potential in the field of plant research.

The Ethelmarie Apter Halpern ‘42 Memorial Community Service Prize Fund is awarded to an undergraduate student who has demonstrated leadership in combating prejudice and fostering good relations within the community or community at large.

The Janet Harris Fund Award is presented to a graduating religion major for excellence in the Religion Program. Preference is given to students pursuing graduate school in Religious Studies or a related field.

The Evenden Daley Herman ‘37 Endowed Prize Fund is awarded to a Goucher College full-time international or immigrant student who has demonstrated leadership and service in college and/or community activities and who promotes understanding among people of different nations.

The Julia Gontrum Hill Award in Music is for the student of the piano who has demonstrated distinction in musical performance and gives evidence of creative potential.

The Max Hochschild Prize for Excellence in Economics is awarded to the student(s) who demonstrate a superior grasp of econometric theory and application as demonstrated by their final econometrics paper in EC 320.

The David Horn Prize in Organic Chemistry is awarded to a senior chemistry major for outstanding achievement in organic chemistry classes and research.

The Sarah T. Hughes 1917 Award for Academic Excellence in Politics and Public Policy is awarded to the senior who has the most outstanding record for academic achievement in politics and public policy.

The Sarah T. Hughes 1917 Award for Excellence in Intellectual Inquiry in International Relations is awarded to a senior major holding a GPA of at least 3.0 who demonstrates exceptional intellectual curiosity regarding politics and world affairs.

The Sarah T. Hughes 1917 Prize for Practical Politics is awarded to a junior or senior major for outstanding achievement in the practice of politics.

The Imani Endowed Travel Stipend Fund was established to provide a study abroad travel stipend to undergraduate students enrolled in the Maryland Scholars Program at Goucher College.

The Julie Roy Jeffrey Award in History supported by the Calvin Fund in History is given to a graduating history major who demonstrated excellence in history throughout his/her career at Goucher College.

The Dr. William S. Johnson Research Fund has been established to support student independent research projects in the areas of ecology and marine biology. It is the intent of this fund to provide resources for both laboratory and field research.

The Louise Kelley Prize in Chemistry is awarded annually to a senior major who has accomplished distinguished work in chemistry. Chemistry majors who plan to enter the field of teaching are given preference.

The Jessie L. King Prize was established by friends and former students of Jessie L. King and is awarded to a senior who has done outstanding work in any science field included in Division III, with special consideration given to the study of mammalian physiology and/or microbiology.

The Kratz Summer Writing Fellowships: Each year, the Kratz Center for Creative Writing at Goucher College offers writing fellowships for the summer. These awards are open to all sophomores, juniors, and seniors who have taken a 200-level and a 300-level (or higher) writing workshop at Goucher College. The fellowships fund worthy projects falling within the following areas: (1) travel and/or research connected to and culminating in a work of creative writing; (2) a writing-related internship at (for example) a literary magazine or book publisher; or (3) attendance at a summer writing conference or workshop.

The Ann Matthews Lacy Prize in Genetics was established to honor Professor Lacy, who was the Geneticist in the Biological Sciences Department at Goucher College from 1959 until her retirement in 1998 and is awarded to a student who has excelled in the field of genetics.

The Ann M. Lacy and Myra Berman Kurtz Fund for Student Research in the Biological Sciences is awarded to underwrite or supplement the presentation expenses incurred by Goucher students engaged in academic research in the biological sciences.

The Elizabeth Deale Lawrence ‘66 and Bryan Huntington Lawrence Prize for Innovative Teaching is awarded annually to either graduating seniors, in good academic and disciplinary standing at the college, who have been accepted by and are entering service in Teach for America; or recent alumnae/i who have graduated from Goucher in good academic and disciplinary standing and are currently serving in Teach for America.

The Pearl Davis Leavitt ‘28 Prize in Mathematics is given annually to a mathematics major, other than a graduating senior, who has exhibited meritorious achievements in mathematics beyond the first-year level and who is judged to have outstanding potential for further high achievement in the discipline.

The Stephen K. F. and Katherine W. Lee Prize in Historic Preservation is awarded each year to one or more master of arts in historic preservation students who have prepared the most outstanding paper or project that addresses diversity in America’s cultural and architectural heritage.

The Gloria Levine Prize in Communication and Media Studies in honor of Brownlee Sands Corrin is awarded annually to juniors or seniors enrolled in good standing in the undergraduate program at Goucher College, who have declared a major in the communication and media studies program, and who have participated in a meaningful way in the media community of Goucher’s campus and/or the Baltimore metropolitan area. When possible, special consideration will be given to students who have demonstrated a commitment to the field of communication and show promising academic growth and performance in their particular communication and media studies discipline. 

The Robert E. Lewand “Beauty in Mathematics” Prize is awarded annually to the student(s) who provide(s) the most innovative, creative display of the beauty of mathematics as it occurs in Nature and the Universe. The display can be artistic, musical, or written, and should convey a mathematical concept or truth in a manner that can be appreciated by the entire community, and not exclusively by those whose area of study strongly intersecs mathematical sciences.

The Robert Lewand Team Academic Achievement Award is presented annually to the team whose members achieved the highest grade point average over the previous two semesters.

The Judy Lewent ‘70 Fund for Summer Research in the Sciences was established to provide financial support to the summer research program in the sciences at Goucher College, a program through which students benefit from the opportunity to conduct summer research in close collaboration with faculty members. Income is to fund student stipends, faculty stipends, purchase supplies or satisfy other needs of the program in order to guarantee and enhance the educational experience of science students working on summer research projects.

The Robert Hall Lewis Prize is awarded to one or more students for extraordinary achievement in music.

The Lee Snyder Lovett ‘33 Prize is awarded annually to a senior intending to study law.

 

 

The MACPA Outstanding Student Award is presented annually by the Maryland Association of Certified Public Accountants to a Management student who is outstanding in academic as well as extracurricular activities. In addition to a 3.0 overall GPA, with a minimum of 3.25 in accounting, the winner must demonstrate leadership skills and involvement in campus and community activities. They must also demonstrate their commitment to accounting by becoming a member of MACPA’s Tomorrow CPA Program.

The Jennifer Margolis Marquez ‘01 Prize in Environmental Sustainability is awarded annually to recognize students who demonstrate outstanding innovation and creativity in developing practical applications to environmental/ecological sustainability that have been implemented at Goucher College.

The Master of Arts in Historic Preservation Alumnae/i Prize is awarded annually to an outstanding first-year students as determined by the review of any paper produced during any class taken during a student’s first two semesters of enrollment in the Master of Arts in Historic Preservation Program. The submitted paper will be judged by a 3-member prize committee.

The Mathematics Writing Prize is awarded annually to the student who has demonstrated excellence in the exposition of classical mathematics.

The Hiram McCullough Award is presented each year to one or more master of arts in historic preservation students who have submitted a plan and received approval for their forthcoming thesis work.

The Merck Company Foundation Student Research Fund was established in 1997 by the Merck & Company Foundation for student research in the sciences

The Hugh Miller Award is awarded to a student within the Masters of Historic Preservation Program to attend the annual meeting of the Association for Preservation Technology

The Gairdner B. Moment Award is presented annually to a student who has demonstrated superior achievement in the biological sciences, especially the field of animal development.

The Gail Davis Morris ‘53 Endowed Prize in Music in Honor of Otto Ortmann is awarded to a third- or fourth-year music major who has demonstrated exemplary artistic achievement.

The Joe Morton Award for Outstanding Achievement in Peace Studies is awarded to students who actualize their values as demonstrated by academic excellence, by commitment to and partnerships within the College and the Baltimore community, and by integrity in their personal conduct.

The Edith Snyder Moses ‘46 Prize in Chemistry is awarded to a graduating senior chemistry major enrolled in good standing in the undergraduate program at Goucher College. Chemistry majors who plan to enter medical school or graduate school in medical/scientific research will be given preference.

The Janet Sloane Muller ‘70 Award in English is given to a graduating English major with an outstanding academic record that includes substantial work in courses pertinent to a professional career in publishing and/or journalism.

The Rolf E. Muuss Prize Fund in Special Education is awarded to the most promising student in the area of special education.

The Nast-Naron Award is given annually through the Baltimore Rotary Foundation to fund a summer research project.

The Neumann Award is awarded to the student who best exemplifies the true spirit of physical education by setting an example for all to follow through his/her loyalty, dedication, and service to the ideals of physical education.

The Martha A. Nichols ‘38 Prize is given to the student who has shown outstanding service to the Goucher community.

The Elizabeth Nuss Emerging Leader Award is presented to a first- or second-year student who has contributed significantly to the Goucher community through his/her involvement in a campus organization or community service program, and who show significant potential for continued leadership and civic engagement.

The Virginia Parker ‘28 and Monroe H. Martin Fund for Study of Biological or Cultural Conservation is awarded to deserving undergraduate student(s) studying biology, history, economics or a related field, to facilitate either their study abroad or scholarship activity within the United States while not in residence on the Goucher or Johns Hopkins campus.

The Brooke and Carol Peirce Center for Undergraduate Research in Special Collections Fellowship is awarded for original research using Special Collections & Archives at the Goucher College Library.

The Phi Beta Kappa Brooke Peirce Award in Humanities and Social Sciences is presented annually by the Beta of Maryland Chapter of Phi Beta Kappa. The Brooke Peirce Award in the Humanities and Social Sciences is awarded for academic excellence as demonstrated in an outstanding piece of work completed as part of a humanities course, internship or independent work, except senior theses, during the past two semesters. The competition is open to all full-time juniors and seniors currently enrolled at Goucher College.

The Phi Beta Kappa Brooke Peirce Award in the Fine Arts is presented annually by the Beta of Maryland Chapter of Phi Beta Kappa. The Brooke Peirce Award in the Fine Arts is awarded for academic excellence as demonstrated in an outstanding piece of work completed as part of a fine arts course, internship or independent study, except senior theses, during the past two semesters. The competition is open to all full-time juniors and seniors currently enrolled at Goucher College.

The Phi Beta Kappa Nancy J. Engelhardt ‘64 Memorial Prize in the Sciences is presented by the Alumni of the Beta of Maryland Chapter of Phi Beta Kappa for academic excellence in the sciences. The award is based on an outstanding piece of work prepared during the academic year as part of a course or independent study.

The Beverly and George Pollock Memorial Prize was established by Sanford J. Ungar, the 10th president of Goucher College, and his wife, Dr. Beth Pollock Ungar, to honor Dr. Ungar’s late parents, Beverly and George Pollock, who greatly appreciated music and believed it played a significant role in all our lives. This prize is awarded to an outstanding music major who has demonstrated academic achievement and proficiency in musical performance. 

The Richard Pringle Prize Fund is awarded to seniors majoring or minoring in psychology who have demonstrated exceptional achievement in social-justice-focused inquiries or programmatic initiatives that advance understanding, equity, empowerment or marginalized communities, or positive systemic change.

The Gertrude Sherby Rand ‘33 Prize is awarded to a senior in visual arts who has made a distinguished contribution to both curricular and extracurricular college life.

The Lizette Woodworth Reese Awards are given to junior and senior English majors for a body of work in creative writing that shows talent, excellence, and accomplishment in writing prose, poetry, and/or fiction writing.

The Julia Rogers Research Prize sponsored by the Friends of the Goucher College Library, for outstanding research by Goucher students using library resources.

The Mary Carmen Rose Prize in Philosophy supported by the Ruth A. Katz Fund is awarded annually to a senior who has demonstrated outstanding work and shows unusual promise in philosophy.

The Ruth Blaustein Rosenberg 1921 Prize in Music established in 1974 and is given to a senior who has demonstrated excellence in the study of music and gives evidence of creative potential.

The Scholar-Athlete Award is presented since 1913 annually to a member of the Junior Class who has consistently demonstrated varied and admirable participation in athletics and extracurricular activities, in conjunction with maintaining high standards of academic achievement.

The Shirley C. Seagren ‘53 Prize for International Studies is awarded to a Goucher College junior who has demonstrated meritorious academic achievement in the exploration of international issues, languages, and cultures and has participated in a Goucher College sponsored study abroad program.

Senior Leadership Awards honor those seniors who have made significant contributions to campus life over a period of two or more years. They have demonstrated effectiveness in organizing campus activities, a capacity to work with peers in an advisory or mentor role, and enthusiastic support for the college’s mission and goals.

The Leah Seidman Shaffer ‘26 Prize in Microbiology is awarded each year to a student who has conducted outstanding independent study in which the concepts and methods of microbiology were used.

The Tillie Snyder Schonfield ‘36 Prize in Biology is awarded annually to a graduating senior or seniors enrolled in good standing in the undergraduate program at Goucher College who has done outstanding work in the field of biology. Biology majors who plan to enter the field of teaching will be given preference.

The Helen Carroll Shelley ‘24 Prize in Romance Languages is awarded to students majoring in Romance languages who have demonstrated proficiency in the language.

The Pearl Simon Fund was established to support personal growth and development of a student or students through activities and projects undertaken by a student(s) in the undergraduate program of Goucher College. The award is meant to provide a unique opportunity, experience, interaction or exposure to people, a program, culture/class beyond the student’s(s’) current life experience.

The Ariel Singer Prize has been established to recognize academic and intellectual excellence of a student in the International Relations program.

The Edith Ford Sollers ‘31 Memorial Award in Chemistry is an annual prize for a senior major in chemistry who exhibits a high degree of distinction in scientific study and qualities of character and leadership in campus activities.

The Stephania Maniosky Sommerman ‘34 Prize Fund is awarded to a student enrolled in the college’s music program. Preference is given to students who have demonstrated academic achievement and proficiency in musical performance.

The Eleanor Spencer Award is a grant to underwrite travel expenses for students doing independent study projects in art history. The award is determined by a competitive application process that assesses the merits of the research project.

The Stephanie Stanley Dance/Health Science Award is a prize given to a junior or senior at Goucher College who has an interest in and commitment to dance and the sciences and brings the study of anatomy, physiology, kinesiology, nutrition, and related fields to bear on the art and practice of dance. In addition to the financial award, an internship opportunity is given to work alongside Dr. Lew Schon, MedStar Union Memorial Hospital’s director of foot and ankle services in Baltimore.

 The Student Employee of the Year Award is presented annually to a student who has contributed significantly to the Goucher community through his/her employment in a campus department. The award is based on a student’s reliability, contribution, quality of work, disposition, and initiative.

The Beulah B. Tatum Award in Education is given to a senior major who is considered an outstanding and promising student in the field of education.

The Isabelle Kellogg Thomas English Prize is presented annually to the sophomore and junior who rank best in English. Written and spoken English and knowledge of American literature are determining factors.

The Ruth Baird Thompson ‘31 Award for Scholarship, Sportsmanship, and Athleticism is presented annually to one or more students who are enrolled in the college’s undergraduate or graduate programs who have demonstrated academic excellence and sportsmanship through their participation in Goucher’s sports, dance and/or equestrian programs.

The Marian M. Torrey Prize in Mathematics is awarded to a senior major in mathematics who is judged by the program to have an excellent record based on a firm grasp of subject matter, creative imagination, incisive thinking, and ability to present ideas clearly.

The Rory Turner Cultural Sustainability Prize was established in 2014 in honor of Goucher faculty member and program founder, Dr. Rory Turner. The prize recognizes leadership and vision as demonstrated through a student’s Capstone project. The Capstone represents the student’s culminating work in the program. A panel of judges selects the recipient based on originality, overall quality, significance to the field, integrity, and critical reflections, as well as contribution to community vitality and cultural equity.

The Education Prize in Honor of Eli Velder is awarded to one or more graduating seniors who have completed the requirements for certification in teaching at a secondary level and who have demonstrated exceptional performance in the field of education.

The Betty Cooper Wallerstein ‘58 Prize Fund in Sociology is awarded in honor of Mrs. Wallerstein’s parents, Adele and Joseph Cooper, and a former dean and teacher, Leona S. Morris ‘35, to one or more students majoring in sociology who demonstrate service, leadership and academic excellence. Preference will be given to students who have demonstrated an interest in pursuing graduate studies in sociology, or a career in social work or other humanitarian projects.

The Welsh Science Internship Fund was given by Katherine E. Welsh. Income from the fund will be used for awarding stipends to students working with faculty on summer research projects.

The Christine White Award is given in memory of Christine Mehl White ‘00 who passed away when the plane that she and her husband were in crashed. She was a graduate from the MFA in Creative Nonfiction program. The fund was created by the Graduate Programs Department and donations to the fund are by friends and classmates of Ms. White.

The Ruth C. Wylie Prize is awarded annually to senior psychology majors who have achieved exceptional intellectual and experiential distinction and who show great professional promise in psychology.

The Judith S. Yoffie ‘43 Judaic Studies Memorial Fund was established to help advance a student’s education in Judaic Studies by providing funding for independent study projects at Goucher College.

Fellowships

Special fellowships are available to graduating seniors of Goucher College for full-time graduate work. Applications for fellowships should be made at https://www.goucher.edu/career-education-office/graduate-school/fellowship-application and should be returned to the Associate Provost no later than the beginning of March. Students should consult with the associate provost for exact dates.

For the Class of 1905, the Eleanor Voss, and the Flora E. Langdon Fellowships, applicants must complete the Financial Aid Form and submit it directly to Student Financial Services no later than the beginning of March.

For Graduates of Goucher College:

The Class of 1905 Fellowships are intended to support Goucher College graduates in their pursuit of graduate study in international affairs: cultural, economic and political but may also be awarded to support other graduate work.

The Elizabeth King Ellicott Fellowships are awarded each year to graduates of Goucher College for the study of government and politics in the U.S.

The Flora E. Langdon Fellowship provides tuition assistance to Goucher College graduates in their pursuit of graduate study in the sciences.

The Io DeGraw Mears Fund in Library Science provides fellowships for Goucher graduates who pursue advanced studies in library science.

The Stimson-Duvall Fellowship is awarded to graduates who show professional promise and outstanding qualifications for graduate studies in the natural, physical, biological, and medical sciences or the related field of history of science.

The Dean Van Meter Alumnae/i Fellowships are intended to support Goucher College graduates in their pursuit of graduate or professional study, in this country or abroad.

The Eleanor Voss ‘56 Fellowship is awarded annually to a graduating senior who has achieved an outstanding academic record and who will pursue the study of law. Preference is given to students who will attend Harvard Law School. In the event there is no highly qualified student intending to study law, the fellowship may be awarded to a graduating senior in the field of international relations, economics, history, or political science who has achieved the highest academic record among the senior majors in those fields and who intends to pursue graduate work.

For Undergraduate Students of Goucher College:

The Mary Derrickson McCurdy ‘30 Fellowship is awarded to provide support for students to do summer research or advanced course work at a marine biology laboratory.

The Florence B. & Mabel V. Seibert Fellowship is used for fellowships or activities in the field of bio-chemistry.

The Brooke and Carol Peirce Fellowships award undergraduates in all disciplines the opportunity to conduct significant original research using materials in Special Collections & Archives at Goucher College.