Goucher College 2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalogue 
    
    Jan 20, 2022  
Goucher College 2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalogue PLEASE NOTE: This is an archived catalog. Programs are subject to change each academic year.

Course Descriptions


 

Africana Studies

  
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    AFR 200 - Introduction to Africana Studies (4 Cr.)

    (cross-listed with HIS 200) (LER DIV) (GCR RPP) (GCR Humanities and Interdisciplinary Studies area)
    Rather than teaching the history and culture of Africa or communities in the African diaspora, “Introduction to Africana Studies” aims to provide students in the Africana studies minor with key theories, approaches, and critical lenses that they may use in ensuing coursework and research in the Africana minor program. This reading- and writing- intensive course covers such topics as: basic geographical and demographic information about the continent of Africa and the African diaspora; the history of Africana studies in academe; theories that embrace the view that there are many Black experiences, rather than one overarching worldview; approaches toward the examination of Black identities within the context of gender, race, sexuality, and class; and select, exemplary humanistic/social scientific research by pioneering scholars in Africana studies.

American Studies

  
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    AMS 205 - Issues in American Studies (2 Cr.)


    More than any other nation, America has envisioned itself as a place of opportunity.  With hard work, ambition, and a dash of luck, even the poorest among us can move up the ladder-or at least create the conditions for our children to move up. We know the dream is far from a reality, and yet this creed, as President Obama called it, continues to animate and shape our public discourse. Some of the obstacles to equality of opportunity are well known and well documented. In this course, we’re going to dig a little deeper and explore some of the largely invisible and surprising factors that influence upward-and downward–mobility.  We’ll look at the role zip codes, child rearing techniques, internships, and legacy admissions, among other factors, play in curtailing movement and maintaining the status quo. My hope is that even as we reflect on the constraints on mobility we will feel inspired to reclaim the dream. Spring semester. Marchand. Marchand.
  
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    AMS 230 - Religions of Baltimore (4 Cr.)

    (GCR RPP)(GCR Humanities and Interdisciplinary Studies area)(LER TXT)
    This course will provide an introduction to the world religions through attention to the religious life of Baltimore, MD and the engagement of religious communities in social justice work. Organized around two to three rotating themes such as housing, the environment, or gun violence, this course will explore the ways in which race, class, and imbalances of power and privilege contribute to structures of injustice. Readings and course work on the religious histories and theologies that inspire this work will be combined with community-based learning opportunities to increase the religious literacy and interreligious engagement skills of students. Offered fall 2019. Duncan.
  
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    AMS 290 - Internship (0-4 Cr.)


  
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    AMS 299 - Independent Work (3-4 Cr.)


  
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    AMS 497 - Capstone in American Studies (2 Cr.)


    This course is organized around the idea that moving forward begins with looking backward. It asks you to engage deeply and complexly with your undergraduate careers as American Studies Majors in preparation for life and work after graduation. The first half of the semester will focus on developing your awareness of your own path through American Studies as a distinctive path and being able to situate this path in the context of the field. We will use eportfolios to collect, study, and share these reflections. This part of the course will culminate in an intellectual autobiography. Through conversations with alumni, presentations by employers, and informational interviews, the second half of the course will invite you to think about and see your futures more clearly. This half of the course will culminate in a cover letter you can use for job or graduate school applications and a modified version of the elevator pitch: a 3-minute video where you demonstrate your skill at answering the inevitable question - - “What can you do with an American Studies Major?” – with a crisp, clear, summary of the specific skills you’ve acquired and the paths you see open to you. Prerequisites: AMS 205 - Issues in American Studies (2 Cr.)  and senior standing. Spring. Marchand.

Arabic

A minimum of C- must be attained to advance from one course to the next.

  
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    ARB 110 - Elements of Arabic I (4 Cr.)


    An introduction to the Arabic alphabet, this initial course is designed to give students with no prior knowledge of Arabic a foundation in the language, with special emphasis on the development of vocabulary and basic conversational and reading skills. Four contact hours with the instructor. Prerequisite: placement. Fall and spring semesters.
  
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    ARB 120 - Elements of Arabic II (4 Cr.)


    In the second semester, students develop communicative skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) at an elementary level within the context of Arabic culture broadly defined. Four contact hours with the instructor. Prerequisite: placement or   with a minimum grade of C-. Fall and spring semesters.
  
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    ARB 130 - Intermediate Arabic I (4 Cr.)

    (LER-FL)
    Building on the previous elementary work in Arabic, this course furthers the study of the vocabulary, grammar and syntax through intensive aural, reading and written practice. Discussions are grounded in contemporary Arabic culture. Four contact hours with the instructor. Prerequisite: placement or ARB 120  with a minimum grade of C-. Class will run upon sufficient demand.
  
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    ARB 132 - Special Topics in Language and Culture (2 Cr.)


    Working in small groups or within other collaborative formats, students will explore cultural themes and apply grammatical concepts in the target language through the use of authentic materials such as literary and journalistic texts, advertisements, films, songs, or digital media. ARB 132 focuses on the attainment of low-intermediate level of proficiency. Students completing the FLCR must take ARB 132 to complete the FLCR on Platforms 1 and 2. They may take two 132 courses instead of ARB 130  (4 cr.) if the topic is different and course is available. Two 132 courses are the prerequisite for 200 level coursework, the major or the minor. Any student having previously completed 130 or a level beyond 130 may not take 132 for credit. Prerequisite: ARB 120  or equivalent with a minimum grade of C-.
  
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    ARB 133 - Intermediate Arabic (2 or 4 Cr.)


    This course furthers the study of the vocabulary, grammar, and syntax through intensive aural, reading and written practice. Students will explore cultural themes and apply grammatical concepts in the target language through the use of authentic materials such as literary and journalistic texts, advertisements, films, songs, or digital media. Four weekly contact hours with the instructor. Prerequisite: placement or ARB 120  with a minimum grade of C-. Fall and Spring semesters. Khamis.
  
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    ARB 229 - Gateway to Arabic ICA (2 Cr.)


    This seven-week course focuses on language, cultural, and cinema terminology preparation. Spring. Khamis, Martin.
  
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    ARB 230 - Intro to Modern Arab Culture: Dissenting Voices, Liberating Visions (4 Cr.)

    (LER-TXT and DIV)(GCR RPP)
    In a century of social and political upheaval, Arab writers, critics, visual artists, and filmmakers have produced a compelling body of work that challenges oppressive structures and traditions. In this introductory class, students will engage in a close, contextual reading of a wide array of cultural works produced by some of the most provocative voices from Egypt, Lebanon, Palestine, Syria, and Iraq. Students will examine the ways that gender, class, war, and colonialism inform the poetry, fiction, films, music, and art of the modern Arab world. Readings will include translations of arabic texts and discussions will be conducted in English. Prerequisites: None. Spring. First Offered 2012. Khamis.
  
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    ARB 234 - Conversation and Composition (4 Cr.)


    Development of conversational and writing skills in Arabic through the study and discussion of texts, news, songs, and films. Special emphasis on acquisition of vocabulary, grammar practice, and writing short essays. Prerequisites: Placement, ARB 130 , or both sections of ARB 132  with a minimum grade of C-. Khamis.
  
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    ARB 272G - Intensive Course Abroad (4 Cr.)

    (LER SA)(GCR SA)


    Arab Cinemas, Cultures and Identities

     

    This course introduces students to the variety of Arab cinemas from the eastern part of the Arab world to the Maghreb. Students analyze films and film movements via a representative sample of films from the region, organized thematically (e.g. women’s films, nationalism, faith, war). The course further provides students with an initiation to Levantine conversational Arabic in Nazareth. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or permission of the instructors. Khamis, Martin. Spring/summer 2014 and alternate years.

  
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    ARB 299 - Independent Work (1-4 Cr.)


    This course (variable credits) is designed for students who have completed ARB 234 and wish to direct their learning in Arabic toward their major’s content. Material studied in this course will be designed in accordance with the contents of the individual major. Prerequisite: ARB 234 . Khamis.

Studio Art

  
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    ART 102 - Visual Thinking (4 Cr.)

    (LER - ARC)(GCR Arts area)
    Exploration of the basic materials, concepts, languages, and techniques of the two-dimensional visual arts. Topics include line, shape, value, color, texture, and space. Emphasis on creative exercises in and out of class. Fall semester, repeated spring semester. Abarbanel, Thompson, Staff.
  
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    ART 114 - Drawing I: Introduction to Materials and Methods (4 Cr.)

    (LER - ARC)(GCR Arts area)
    Drawing from landscape, interiors, still life, and human form, students learn fundamentals of composition, tone, texture, perspective, and three-dimensional form. The course employs a variety of drawing media. Emphasis on observation and organization. Fall semester, repeated in spring semester. Abarbanel, McConville.
  
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    ART 120 - Bookbinding and Artists’ Books (4 Cr.)

    (BKS 120) (GCR Arts area)
    A hands-on course to learn basic bookbinding skills and techniques including Japanese, case, and library binding. Students will explore the rich field of artists’ books, altered books, and journals, while examining the relationship between text, visual narrative and sequencing. Students will gain practical knowledge of paper, tools, and materials.   or  . Lab/class fees of $25 will be assessed in fall 2019 and $35 in spring 2020. Spring semester, variable years. Massey
  
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    ART 127 - Object, Meaning, Context: Fundamentals in 3-D (4 Cr.)

    (LER - ARC)(GCR Arts area)
    This course emphasizes fundamental ways of conceptualizing and constructing forms in space. We will investigate the underlying principles of three-dimensional design through guided problem solving that allows the exploration of a broad range of basic materials and builds a solid set of technical and constructive skills. Through hands-on studies, we examine the relationship between context and object, materials and subject, using the formal language of design to unlock the resolution of content. Museum visits, visiting artists, and slide/digital lectures. Lab/class fees of $25 will be assessed in fall 2019 and $35 in spring 2020. Fall semester, repeated in spring semester. Massey.
  
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    ART 201 - Photography I (4 Cr.)

    (COM 201 ) (LER - ARC)(GCR Arts area)
    This course will introduce the basic concepts of camera vision and black and white photographic materials. The chief goal of the course is to provide you with technical skills and visual theory to produce photographs that reflect your interests and your view of the world. You will learn to operate all the major controls of film and digital cameras, expose negatives accurately, and produce a range of black and white prints. Through lectures, demonstrations, readings, and discussions, you will be encouraged to pursue your own ideas and interest in response to assignments. This course is designed for students with previous experience and for beginners with no experience. Students must have their own 35mm film camera, some assignments give students the option to work with a digital camera. Lab/class fee of $45 will be assessed. Fall semester, repeated spring semester. Burns, and program faculty.
  
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    ART 204 - Digital Imaging I (4 Cr.)

    (COM 204 ) (LER-ARC)(GCR Arts area)
    This course is an introduction to concepts concerning the principles, methods, techniques, and vocabulary of the most widely used digital imaging processes. The primary focus will be learning various aspects of Adobe Photoshop, creating digitally composited images, and creating digital prints. The course emphasizes creativity while using software applications as fine arts tools, as well as achieving technical skill. Lab/class fee of $35 will be assessed in fall 2019 and $45 in spring 2020. Fall semester, repeated spring semester. Offered every semester. Delaney.
  
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    ART 210 - Introduction to Relief Printmaking (4 Cr.)

    (formerly ART 110) (GCR Arts area)
    Introduction to the materials and methods of relief printmaking, including woodcut and linocut, with emphasis on understanding and using fundamental design concepts. Discussion of the history of relief printing techniques in the fine and applied arts. Guest artists, slide lectures. Lab/class fees of $25 will be assessed. Variable semesters.
  
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    ART 213 - Life Drawing (4 Cr.)

    (GCR Arts area)
    Drawing from the model in a variety of media. Focus on anatomical, structural, and expressive elements of the human form. Prerequisite: ART 114  or permission of the instructor. Lab/model fees of $25 will be assessed. Spring semester. Staff.
  
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    ART 225 - Painting I: Introduction to Materials and Methods (4 Cr.)

    (LER - ARC only if taken prior to fall 2015)(GCR Arts area)
    Introduction to the materials and methods of oil painting with emphasis on perceptual painting. Composition, tone, color mixing, paint handling; using a variety of approaches. Prerequisite: ART 114  or permission of the instructor. Fall semester, repeated spring semester. Abarbanel, McConville.
  
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    ART 230 - Sculpture I (4 Cr.)

    (GCR Arts area)
    Continuation and deepening of seeing, thinking, and working in three dimensions from ART 127 . Referencing 30,000 years of makers, assignments include site-specific and time-based installation work. Studio work in a range of materials and processes, including welding, casting, modeling, and construction. Emphasis on idea generation, close observation, and development of editing and critical evaluation skills. Readings and slide presentations, museum, gallery, and artist studio visits. Prerequisite: ART 127 . Lab/class fees of $25 will be assessed in fall 2019 and $35 in spring 2020. Variable semesters. Massey.
  
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    ART 251 - Experimental Animation and Motion Design (4 Cr.)

    (COM 251) (GCR ARTS area)
    This course focuses on concepts & techniques of various types of 2D animation in visual arts. Using Adobe Creative Cloud applications, such as After Effects, Photoshop, Animate, Character Animator, & Premiere, students will create animations and motion graphics. Students explore concepts & techniques such as Pixilation, Kinestatis, frame-by-frame (cell animation), stop-motion & other forms of animation, as well as explore the use of motion design. Topics include storyboarding, drawing & animatics, editing, and audio-synchronization. Spring semester, offered alternate years. Lab/class fee of $35 will be assessed. Delaney.
  
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    ART 252 - Digital Film and Sound (Digital Film and Sound)

    4 Cr. (COM 252) (GCR ARTS area)
    This course focuses on concepts & techniques of various types of time-based media in visual arts. Using Adobe Creative Cloud applications, such as Premiere, After Effects, Audition & Photoshop, students will create projects that explore digital film, sound and have the ability to create a time-based installation artwork. Topics include storyboarding, transitions, effects, film capture & editing, and audio-synchronization. Spring semester, offered alternate years. Lab/class fee of $35 will be assessed. Delaney.
  
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    ART 257 - Graphic Design/Data Visualization (4 Cr.)

    (GCR DA-AC)(GCR Arts area)
    This course introduces students to basic digital design tools to effectively and successfully represent and communicate information. Students will learn to analyze and produce works that rely on the organization of line, text, color, and images to transmit meaning and values that visually display various quantities found in specific data sets and other information. Through a series of weekly studio assignments and critiques, supplemented by short readings, class discussions and lectures students will develop unique design strategies for effective visual communication. Prerequisite: completion of GCR Data Analytics Foundational Level. Djouini.
  
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    ART 259 - Special Topics in Studio Art (4 Cr.)

    (GCR Arts area)
    This theme/medium based 200-level studio course will provide intermediate students an opportunity to explore a specific topic, concept, or medium in the studio arts. Course content is developed by the individual instructor, Techniques and ideas appropriate to course content will be developed through assignments, readings, writings, and critiques. Students will be encouraged to develop their technical skills and connect these skills to other courses within the studio curriculum and to other academic endeavors. This course is open to students concentrating in any area of studio art and is repeatable for a total of twenty credits.  First offered 2016 and variable years. Program faculty.
  
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    ART 303 - Intermediate Photography (4 Cr.)

    (formerly ART 203) (COM 303 ) (GCR Arts area)
    This course extends and deepens the skills acquired in Photography I. You will broaden your understanding of film exposure and printing controls, explore low light photography, artificial light sources and flash, and experiment with films and papers. Projects are designed to engage with ideas about genres of photography while simultaneously increasing technical knowledge and skills. The course will include darkroom work, lectures, readings, and field trips. Students must have their own 35mm film camera or DSLR. Prerequisite: ART 201  or COM 201 . Lab/class fee of $45 will be assessed. Fall semester, repeated spring semester. Burns and program faculty.
  
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    ART 303-IW - Independent Work in Studio - Printmaking (1.5-4 Cr.)


    Advanced studies in Studio Art. Prerequisites:   or   plus three studio courses (two of which should be in the same medium as the independent work proposed) and a written contract with the faculty member willing to oversee the study. Fall semester, repeated Spring semester.
  
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    ART 313 - Digital Imaging II (4 Cr.)

    (formerly ART 312) (COM 313 ) (GCR Arts area)
    This course offers an advanced exploration of Adobe Photoshop® building on groundwork covered in Digital I. Students will work on more complex projects, further investigating their conceptual and technical capabilities. Lab/class fee of $35 will be assessed. Prerequisite: ART 204 . Spring semester, offered alternate years. Delaney.
  
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    ART 329 - Painting II (4 Cr.)

    (GCR Arts area)
    Building on the skills developed in Painting I, the course begins by exploring abstract and non-objective painting approaches. Students will then move to a project based series of works that is intended to develop a more personal way of painting. Prerequisite: ART 225 . Fall semester, repeated spring semester. Abarbanel, McConville.
  
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    ART 331 - Sculpture II (4 Cr.)

    (GCR Arts area)
    Studio work emphasizes the deepening development of personal vision begun in Sculpture I. Materials and processes to augment that goal are wide-ranging and driven by the needs of the student’s research, but can include time-based work, video, sound, as well as welding, stone carving, use of materials such as fiberglass, rubber molds, found object, mixed mediums. Technical competence and craft serve aesthetic concerns and formal understanding. Visits to artists’ studios, readings in current critical thought, slide lectures, exhibitions. Prerequisite: ART 230 . Spring semester. Offered variable semesters. Massey.
  
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    ART 356 - Professional Practices for Visual Artists (4 Cr.)

    (formerly ART 256) (GCR Arts area)
    This course introduces and examines a wide range of strategies for developing a professional practice as a working visual artist. Course includes preparing for an exhibition - including repairing/preparing gallery walls, press releases, invitations, framing, installing (2-D & 3-D work) and lighting. Other topics covered are documenting and archiving artwork, preparing submission materials, writing artist statements, grant writing and research, understanding the culture and structure of non-profit and commercial exhibition venues, exploring collaborative exhibition opportunities, social networking in the  field, and creating a CV and portfolio for graduate school, exhibition and grants. Course work may include; mounting an exhibition in the Corrin Gallery, conception and preparation of curatorial proposals, conception and design of the thesis exhibition, course sessions held off-campus offering students the opportunity to meet diverse groups of professionals in the field, including artists, writers, curators, and administrators.  Prerequisite: two studio art courses, one of which must be at the 200-level, or permission of the instructor. Variable semesters. Program faculty.
  
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    ART 375 - Special Topics: Photographic Practices (4 Cr.)

    (COM 409 ) (GCR Arts area)
    ART 375/COM 409 is a theme-based course in digital or black and white photography for students who have completed ART 201 /COM 201 , Photography I. The class will provide students an in-depth understanding of a particular topic in contemporary photography. Students will use technical and conceptual knowledge learned in Photography I while developing new techniques and ideas related to the course topic. Work for the class will include prompts/assignments, readings, writing, critiques and self-directed research. A different theme will be offered every semester. Examples of topics include Photography and Narrative, The Extended Photographic Project, and People and Places. A lab fee of $45 will be assessed. Students may repeat the course each time a new topic is offered. Prerequisite: ART 201  or COM 201 . Variable semesters. Program faculty.
  
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    ART 380 - Special Topics in Studio Art (4 Cr.)

    (GCR Arts area)
    A theme-based studio course will give advanced students an in-depth understanding of a particular topic in the studio arts. Techniques and ideas appropriate to the topic will be explored through assignments, readings, writings, and critiques. Students will be encouraged to develop their individual interpretation and understanding of the topic within the theoretical and conceptual framework of course discussion and studio work. This course is open to students concentrating in any area of studio art. Repeatable if topic is different. Prerequisite: two 200-level courses in studio art or permission of the instructor. Offered variable years.
  
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    ART 390 - Internship in Art (0-4 Cr.)

    (formerly ART 290)
    Internship opportunities can include work in public museums, commercial galleries, and auction houses; municipal, state, and federal arts foundations; individual assistantships with artists, alternative spaces, graphic studios, photographers, or filmmakers. May be taken pass/no pass or for a letter grade. Prerequisite: Permission of program director or and art faculty agreeing to serve as internship advisor.  Junior or senior standing or three courses at the 200-level in the major recommended. Arranged by the student: summer break, winter break, or during the semester.
  
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    ART 393 - Junior Seminar: Art and Audience (4 Cr.)

    (formerly ART 293)
    Art and Audience serves as an introduction to contemporary practices in the visual arts. The course is designed as a seminar and critique course, and emphasizes the relationship between art making, culture, and audience. Students will create artwork based on personal interests, and current and previous art classes. Class discussions and assigned readings develop students’ critical and conceptual skills, while artist lectures and gallery/museum visits help students contextualize their artwork in contemporary artistic practices. Students will receive regularly assigned readings, attend artist presentations and galleries, and participate in class discussions about their own art work. This course is a core requirement for the Art major and minor. Prerequisite: three studio courses, one of which must be a 200-level class or permission of instructor. Fall semester. Program faculty.
  
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    ART 403 - Independent Work in Studio-Printmaking (2-4 Cr.)

    (formerly ART 303)
    Advanced studies in studio art. Prerequisites: ART 102  or ART 127  plus three studio courses (two of which should be in same medium as the independent work proposed), and a written contract
    with the faculty member willing to oversee the study. Fall semester, repeated spring semester.
  
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    ART 405 - Independent Work in Studio-Drawing (2-4 Cr.)

    (formerly ART 305)
    Advanced studies in studio art. Prerequisites: ART 102  or ART 127  plus three studio courses (two of which should be in same medium as the independent work proposed), and a written contract
    with the faculty member willing to oversee the study. Courses include: 304-IW Clay, 305-IW Drawing, 306-IW Painting, 307-IW Photography, 308-IW Sculpture, 309-IW Mixed-Media
    Installation. Fall semester, repeated spring semester.
  
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    ART 406 - Independent Work in Studio-Painting (2-4 Cr.)

    (formerly ART 306)
    Advanced studies in studio art. Prerequisites: ART 102  or ART 127  plus three studio courses (two of which should be in same medium as the independent work proposed), and a written contract
    with the faculty member willing to oversee the study. Courses include: 304-IW Clay, 305-IW Drawing, 306-IW Painting, 307-IW Photography, 308-IW Sculpture, 309-IW Mixed-Media
    Installation. Fall semester, repeated spring semester.
  
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    ART 407 - Independent Work in Studio-Photography (2-4 Cr.)

    (formerly ART 307) (COM 407 )
    Advanced studies in studio art. Prerequisites: ART 102  or ART 127  plus three studio courses (two of which should be in same medium as the independent work proposed), and a written contract
    with the faculty member willing to oversee the study. Courses include: 304-IW Clay, 305-IW Drawing, 306-IW Painting, 307-IW Photography, 308-IW Sculpture, 309-IW Mixed-Media
    Installation. Fall semester, repeated spring semester.
  
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    ART 408 - Independent Work in Studio-Sculpture (2-4 Cr.)

    (formerly ART 308)
    Advanced studies in studio art.  Lab/class fee of $25 will be assessed. Prerequisites: ART 102  or ART 127  plus three studio courses (two of which should be in same medium as the independent work proposed), and a written contract with the faculty member willing to oversee the study. Courses include: 304-IW Clay, 305-IW Drawing, 306-IW Painting, 307-IW Photography, 308-IW Sculpture, 309-IW Mixed-Media Installation.  Fall semester, repeated spring semester. Program faculty.
  
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    ART 409 - Independent Work in Studio-Mixed Media (2-4 Cr.)

    (formerly ART 309)
    Advanced studies in studio art. Prerequisites: ART 102  or ART 127  plus three studio courses (two of which should be in same medium as the independent work proposed), and a written contract with the faculty member willing to oversee the study. Courses include: 304-IW Clay, 305-IW Drawing, 306-IW Painting, 307-IW Photography, 308-IW Sculpture, 309-IW Mixed-Media Installation. Fall semester, repeated spring semester.
  
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    ART 497 - Senior Seminar I (4 Cr.)

    (formerly ART 387)
    This is the first in a two course sequence that is the culminating experience for the studio art major. Building on the readings, conversations and research conducted during the Junior Seminar, this course will emphasize process, experimentation, speculation, and productivity. Students will begin to create a body of work for their thesis exhibition in the Corrin Gallery or other venue in the greater Baltimore area or on campus. Students are responsible for initiating, developing and creating a body of studio work. Student progress is evaluated throughout the semester in class critiques and regularly scheduled discussions with their faculty. Students are expected to set ambitious and attainable goals for artwork and to be able to work independently and consistently in an area of focus.  Prerequisite: ART 393 . Fall semester. Program faculty.
  
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    ART 498 - Senior Seminar II (4 Cr.)

    (formerly ART 388)
    This is the second in a two course sequence that is the culminating experience for the studio art major. In this second semester students will create a body of work for their thesis exhibition in the
    Corrin Gallery or other venue in the greater Baltimore area or on campus. Students are responsible for initiating, developing and creating a body of studio work. Student progress is evaluated
    throughout the semester in class critiques and regularly scheduled discussions with their faculty. Students are expected to set ambitious and attainable goals for artwork and to be able to work
    independently and consistently in an area of focus. A written artist statement will accompany the presentation of their work. The statement must address the goals and the art historical and
    theoretical context for their thesis exhibit. Critique of the thesis exhibit with all studio faculty is required.  Prerequisite: ART 497 . Spring semester. Program faculty.

Art History

  
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    ARH 103 - Introduction to the History of Art (4 Cr.)

    (VMC 103) (LER-TXT)
    Introduces the study of Western art and the discipline of art history, its methods, terminology, and critical issues, including the problems of the canon, aesthetics, chronology, and periodization. Students will explore images and objects produced at different moments and in a variety of geographic and cultural contents, considering throughout the ways in which art conveys meaning through visual form, the ebb and flow of various stylistic trends, the use of symbolic images in the sacred and secular realms, the persistence of major visual motifs, the role of the spectator in shaping the meaning the meaning of images and objects, and the influence of political and economic conditions on the making of art.  Spring semester. Oettinger.
  
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    ARH 205 - Museums in the Modern Era (4 Cr.)


    What is a museum? How does it work? Who are the people that make the magic happen? This course will examine the changing role of museums in contemporary society and the various challenges they face. It will also look at three of the major focuses of a museum: Collection Management, Conservation, and Exhibition. Finally, in the 21st century, Education and the Visitor Experience have become two more major areas of focus for all types of museums; how and why did that happen? Course includes one to two mandatory field trips to local museums. Additional visits to museums will be asked of the students in their own time. Open to all students pursuing a Major in Studio Art, Art History, and Historic Preservation or a Concentration in Arts Administration. Sophomore standing required and priority will go to seniors first. Prerequisite courses are ART 102  or VMC 103  (ARH 103 ) or VMC 110  (HP 110 ) or AMG 170 (formerly BUS 170) depending on your course of study, or permission of the instructor. Fall semester. Instructor.
  
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    ARH 263 - Romanticism: Art in the Age of Revolution (4 Cr.)

    (VMC 263)
    European and American painting, sculpture, and visual culture in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, a period of great social, political and cultural upheaval, with particular emphasis on changing attitudes towards tradition, nature, genius, originality, and innovation in the visual arts and how they relate to an emerging modern spirit. Prerequisite: VMC 103  (ARH 103 ) or permission of instructor. Fall. Variable semesters. Art History Faculty.
  
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    ARH 264 - Realism & Impressionism: Art and the Rise of the Middle Class (4 Cr.)

    (VMC 264)
    European and American painting, sculpture, and visual culture from 1840s through the 1880s, with particular emphasis on the economic, political, and intellectual context in which this art was conceived and produced, including the impact of political, economic, and industrial revolutions, urbanization, commercialism and consumerism, and the rise of a middle class.  Prerequisite: VMC 103  (ARH 103 ) or permission of instructor. Fall. Variable semesters. VMC Faculty.
  
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    ARH 266 - Medieval Art (4 Cr.)

    (VMC 266)
    European art from the catacombs to the cathedrals. Includes Early Christian, Carolingian, Romanesque, Gothic, and Byzantine art. Stylistic evolution and the ideas motivating style. A survey from Early Christian art through the High Gothic, including Byzantium. Prerequisite: VMC 103  (ARH 103 ) or permission of instructor. Variable semesters. Oettinger.
  
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    ARH 272Y - Arts of Amsterdam (ICA) (5 Cr.)

    (VMC 272Y) (LER-SA)(GCR-SA)
    This three-week intensive blends Arts Administration-the business practices of arts and culture-with behind-the-scenes explorations of the performing and visual arts in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Students attend performances and tour museums and alternative arts spaces not just experienced as an audience member or tourist, but as an active observer to examine how they are professionally managed and presented. Students will learn about the management and funding structures found in the Netherlands and will frequently meet with administrators, cultural leaders, practitioners, and other behind-the-scenes staff. We will also enjoy and explore the rich offerings of our host country’s culture, history, and architecture, frequently traveling by bike for the ultimate Dutch experience. This program is prioritized for Arts Administration Concentration students and students who are Arts Majors or Minors (Art History, Dance, Music, Studio Arts, Theatre, and VMC). A minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 is required.  Offered every year. Lohr, Oettinger.
  
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    ARH 275 - Renaissance Art in Europe (4 Cr.)

    (VMC 275)
    This course surveys painting, sculpture, and architecture in Europe from the 14th-17th centuries. We will consider northern and southern Renaissance artists from Giotto and Jan Van Eyck to Michelangelo and Durer in their cultural and social contexts. Topics for discussion include the rise of the Artist, the emergence of early modern art theory, the assimilation of antiquity, and the development of portraiture, landscape, and mythological subjects in the visual arts.  Prerequisite: VMC 103  (ARH 103 ) or permission of the instructor. Fall. Variable semesters. Oettinger.
  
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    ARH 279 - Global Rockstars: Baroque and Rococo Art in Europe (4 Cr.)

    (VMC 279)
    This course surveys the painting, sculpture, and architecture of 17th- and 18th- century Europe. We will study masterpieces by artists including Bernini, Caravaggio, Rubens, Rembrandt, Vermeer, Tiepolo, Fragonard, and Hogarth in their social and cultural contexts. Topics for consideration include the development of art theory and art market, the emergence of genres and specialized subject matter, the history of collecting, and the politics of art patronage. Prerequisite: ART 103 of permission of the instructor.  Prerequisite: VMC 103  (ARH 103 ) or permission of the instructor. Spring. Variable semesters. Oettinger.
  
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    ARH 281 - Modern and Contemporary Art & Criticism (4 Cr.)

    (VMC 281)
    Painting and sculpture in Europe. Emphasis on the development and exploration of a modern vision from the late 19th through 21st centuries. Prerequisite: VMC 103  (ARH 103 ) or permission of instructor. Spring semester. VMC faculty.
  
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    ARH 285 - History of Photography (4 Cr.)

    (formerly ART 285) (cross-listed as ARH 285/COM 310)
    The history of photography from the earliest manifestations to the present. Prerequisite: VMC 103  (ARH 103 ) or permission of instructor. Fall semester, alternate years. Burns.
  
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    ARH 288 - Topics in World Art (4 Cr.)

    (ARH 288)
    A course devoted to a variety of changing topics in non-Western art history. May be repeated for credit with different topic. Prerequisite: VMC 103  (ARH 103 ) or permission of the instructor. Spring semester. VMC Faculty.
  
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    ARH 311 - Art in Focus (2 Cr.)

    (VMC 311)
    This intense 7 week course explores a masterpiece of art or primary text (related to the history of art) in context and from different methodological perspectives. Repeatable if topic is different. 
    Prerequisites: VMC 103  (ARH 103 ), VMC 281  (ARH 281 ), or permission from the instructor. Fall and spring semesters. VMC faculty.
  
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    ARH 330 - American Sacred Space (4 Cr.)

    (cross listed as RLG 330)
    This course examines the role of the built environment and natural spaces in American religious experience and practice. Through attention to methodological, theoretical and primary sources, we will examine how Americans have defined and designated spaces as sacred and thereby separate from the profane world. The class will take a field trip to a variety of “sacred spaces” in the Baltimore and/or Washington, D.C. area. Prerequisite: At least one course in Religion or Art History or permission of instructor. Fall semester. Offered 2018 and every other year. Duncan.
  
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    ARH 349 - History and Methods of Art History (2 Cr.)

    (formerly ARH 449) (VMC 349)
    This course explores modes of interpreting art artifacts from various perspectives, including feminism, Marxism, and structuralist methodologies, as well as different forms of analysis, including stylistic, iconographic, and contextual. Students will also learn methods of scholary research appropriate to the discipline, including finding, evaluating, analyzing, and synthesizing primary and secondary visual and textual sources. This project-based course emphasizes an object in Goucher’s Art and Artifacts Collection or documents/books in Special Collections & Archives. Prerequisite: VMC 103  (ARH 103 ) or permission of instructor. Spring semester. VMC faculty.
  
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    ARH 350 - Practicum in Visual and Material Culture (2 Cr.)

    (VMC 350)
    Experience first-hand knowledge in curating, hanging, and opening a show. Students will help the Art & Artifact Collection Curator create and hang a show. Students will learn collection management and registrarial practices, curating and hanging a show, writing wall text as well as being responsible for creating a student written exhibition catalog. Open to seniors. Prerequisite: VMC 205  (ARH 205 ) or permission of the instructor. Spring semester. Instructor.
  
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    ARH 362 - Nature into Art: The Cultural Dimensions of Landscape (4 Cr.)

    (VMC 362) (LER ENV)(GCR ENV)
    This course explores the cultural dimensions of environmental sustainability, the complex relationship between humans and nature, and the historical roots of our ecological crisis through the lens of landscapes and gardenscapes in the visual arts over time and across cultures. Through landscape painting, gardens, and earthworks, we will address the ‘legibility’ and cultural construction of landscape imagery by exploring how artists have shaped, processed, and transformed nature, how humans have projected their identity, values, politics, and myths onto the land, and how visual constructions of landscapes shaped discussions and debates about the past, the present, and the future of the environment. Prerequisite: VMC 103  (ARH 103 ), sophomore standing, or permission of instructor. Spring. Variable semesters. Oettinger.
  
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    ARH 383 - The Art and History of the Book (4 Cr.)

    (ARH 383/BKS 383)
    This course surveys the history of the book and book illustration in the West, with emphasis on the art and poetics of word and image from ancient scrolls and the medieval codex to the printed and hypertext page. We will meet at Goucher’s Special Collections and Archives, which will provide a unique, hands-on opportunity to explore the art and history of the book through our “home” collection.   Our visits to several area collections of books and meet with conservators, collectors, book artists, and booksellers will also comprise a major part of the course. As we travel through a wide range of books from a variety of genres, we will consider the many ways that books make meaning,  physical aspects of books and their production, the evolution of writing (and type), illustration processes and styles, page design, and the artful ways that word and image embellish one another to communicate meaning.  We will also touch on broader questions including the place of books in history, the role of the book in society, the history of reading, manuscript and print culture, and the transformation of illustrated books in the digital age. Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. Fall 2018 and alternate years. Oettinger.

Arts Administration

  
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    AMG 170 - Introduction to Arts Management (4 Cr.)

    (formerly BUS 170)
    An overview of the burgeoning field of arts administration for those considering the profession and to help artists and performers understand the administrative aspects of a nonprofit arts organization. Topics include organizational purpose and management structure, leadership, board governance and issues, fundraising, financial management, program and artistic development, and promotion. Practical projects and guest speakers from professional performance companies and arts institutions. Fall and Spring semester.
  
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    AMG 270 - Case Studies in Art Management (4 Cr.)

    (formerly BUS 270)
    What are the qualifications of a good arts administrator? This course centers on case studies of real arts organizations to present issues and solve management problems. Topics include: artistic content, leadership, fundraising and developing financial resources, community development and educational outreach, audience development, marketing, and crisis communications, technology and cultural facilities. Guest speakers from area organizations are featured. Prerequisite: AMG 170 . Fall semester.

Biological Sciences

  
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    BIO 101 - Explorations in Biology I: The Research Process (4 Cr.)

    (GCR Biological and Physical Sciences area)
    Through an emphasis on scientific inquiry, students will investigate the foundations of cellular and molecular biology, including DNA, RNA, genes, and proteins. In the laboratory, students will actively develop hypotheses and design experiments to test them. Students will also read primary literature, develop quantitative skills to examine their data, and present their research findings. Three hours classroom, three hours laboratory. Fall semester. Hiller, Jozwick, Lee.
  
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    BIO 101H - Explorations in Biology I: Honor Colloq (1 Cr.)


    Seven-week course to apply knowledge from BIO 101  in an interdisciplinary context. Through a series of projects, students will analyze scientific literature and news articles, in addition to practicing the communication of scientific information intended for different audiences (e.g. scientific community, general public, K-12 students). Prerequisite: admission by application. Fall semester. Jozwick.
  
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    BIO 102 - Explorations in Biology II: Life in Context (4 Cr.)

    (LER-NS)(GCR Biological and Physical Sciences area)
    Life in Context explores the diversity of living organisms, the evolutionary relatedness of all organisms, and interconnected associations between organisms. Particular emphasis is placed on the importance of biological diversity to ecosystem health and on issues of human relevance. The fundamental concepts and principles of biology are emphasized throughout the course. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory. Spring semester. Lenkowski, Kicklighter, Simpson.
  
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    BIO 107 - Nutrition (4 Cr.)

    (LER-NS)
    Introduction to the chemical and biological aspects of nutrition, the basic nutrients and their effects on our health and on the environment. Topics such as the energy needs of athletes, weight control, diet fads, supplements and herbs, food safety, and food and drug interactions will be discussed in class, and their understanding will be enhanced through laboratory experiments and fields trips. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory. Variable semesters. Staff.
  
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    BIO 109 - Nutrition (lecture Only) (4 Cr.)

    (GCR Biological and Physical Science area)
    Introduction to the chemical and biological aspects of nutrition, the basic nutrients and their effects on our health and on the environment. Topics such as the energy needs of athletes, weight control, diet fads, supplements and herbs, food safety, and food and drug interactions will be discussed in class. Four hours classroom. Variable semesters. Staff.
  
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    BIO 170 - Environmental Alternatives (4 Cr.)

    (LER-NS AND ENV)(GCR ENV)(GCR Biological and Physical Science area)
    Critical evaluation of pressing environmental issues such as population growth, acid rain, biodiversity, global warming, ozone depletion, and toxic wastes. Special emphasis on how these problems affect the Chesapeake Bay. Examination of conflicting views about the seriousness of these threats and examination of alternative solutions within the context of economic, cultural, and political factors. Four hours classroom/laboratory. Laboratory includes several field trips. This course fulfills the college laboratory science requirement.  Prerequisites: declared Environmental Studies major or permission of the instructor. High school biology or chemistry strongly recommended. Variable semesters.
  
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    BIO 206 - Agriculture and the Environment (4 Cr.)

    (ES 206)
    This course explores the application of scientific principles as they relate to plants, animals, soil and food in agriculture. The impacts of agricultural practices, such as animal breeding, genetics, aquaculture, forestry, organic farming, pest and disease control, genetically modified organisms and their effects on the environment will be discussed. Throughout the course, students will examine the complexity of agricultural systems and how to address the global need for sustainable practices. Four hours classroom. Prerequisite: BIO 101  or BIO 102  or ES 100 . Variable semesters. Jozwick.
  
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    BIO 208 - Human Disease (4 Cr.)


    This course examines human health and disease from a biological perspective. It will provide a focused analysis of the causes and mechanisms of human illness including: infection and immunity, cancer, heredity, and diseases and disorders for each of the major human body systems. Selected diseases will be studied in greater detail including the etiology, pathogenesis and epidemiology. Special attention is paid to infectious disease, cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes and obesity. Prerequisite: a 100-level science course or sophomore standing. Four hours classroom.
  
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    BIO 210 - Cell Biology and Biochemistry (4 Cr.)


    Study of the smallest unit of life focusing on the molecular characteristics of cell components that determine cell behavior. Topics include the composition and structure of the cell membrane, cytoplasm, and organelles in relation to transport, communication, metabolism, division, and locomotion. The models used to explain cell structure, function, and evolution are evaluated in terms of results from selected experiments. Three hours classroom, three hours laboratory. Prerequisites: BIO 101  and CHE 151 . Fall semester. Lenkowski, Levine, and Simpson.
  
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    BIO 220 - Principles of Genetics (4 Cr.)


    Concepts of heredity and their application in a wide variety of organisms from bacteria to humans. Includes classical transmission genetics, chromosomal structure, DNA structure and replication, protein synthesis, gene regulation in prokaryotes and eukaryotes, extra-nuclear heredity, and introduction to molecular analysis of genes and chromosomes. Four hours lecture. Prerequisites: BIO 210  (C- or better) and CHE 230 . Spring semester. Hiller.
  
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    BIO 224 - Techniques in Genetics and Molecular Biology (1 Cr.)

    (WEC)
    Laboratory experience with techniques used in genetics and molecular biology research. These include the use of mutant strains to carry out genetic analyses such as genotypic and phenotypic characterizations, segregation analysis, and genetic mapping. Molecular techniques used to manipulate and analyze DNA are integrated with the genetics analysis and include the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction endonuclease digestion-site mapping. Prerequisite: BIO 210 BIO 220  or concurrent enrollment. Spring semester. Hiller, Lee, Levine.
  
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    BIO 238 - Ecology (4 Cr.)

    (ES 238 ) (LER ENV)(GCR ENV)
    An introduction to the diverse terrestrial, marine, and aquatic habitats of the Earth and how the organisms found these habitats interact with their biotic and abiotic environment. Individual, population, community, and ecosystem levels of ecology will be discussed, with an emphasis on environmental sustainability and how climate change and other human induced activities may impact the ecology of organisms. Lecture, discussion, and some fieldwork. Four hours classroom. Course not open to students enrolled in BIO 340  or biological science majors or minors. Prerequisite: ES 100 . Variable semesters. Kicklighter.
  
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    BIO 243 - Field Methods in Tropical Ecology (4 Cr.)


    Targeting natural/biological science majors, this course will explore topics of tropical ecology (biodiversity, cloud forest ecosystems, and others) in greater depth, with emphasis placed on learning research methodologies that can be used in field-based or laboratory research. Prerequisite: One course in biology or ecology with a lab or field component.
  
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    BIO 244 - Environmental Sustainability (4 Cr.)

    (LER-ENV)(GCR-ENV)
    Students examine and analyze concepts of sustainability and their global and local interpretations and meanings as framed by global-local issues: climate change, ecotourism and economic development, environmentalism, human health, conservation, and biodiversity. Emphasis is placed on contextualized examples of environmental, economic, social, political, and cultural tensions related to sustainability. Includes field trips, exercises, and guest lectures by local scientists and activists. This course will not count toward the major. Credit will be awarded only one time-for Goucher’s BIO 170  or this course (BIO 244).
  
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    BIO 261 - Human Anatomy (4 Cr.)


    An introductory human anatomy course that emphasizes the relationship between form and function. A combined approach of lecture, laboratory and interactive learning technologies will be employed to demonstrate normal function and clinical variation. A systems approach including musculoskeletal, digestive, cardiovascular, respiratory, urinary, endocrine, reproductive, and integumentary systems will be used. Early development stages and organization at the cellular, tissue and anatomical region levels will be integrated into the systems approach. Students will acquire the fundamentals of human anatomy relevant for clinical application. Students will be required to work with preserved bones, organs and specimens for dissection. Three hours classroom, three hours laboratory. Prerequisite: one 200-level college biology course, or permission of the instructor. Spring Semester 2020. Staff.
  
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    BIO 279 - Directed Reading in Biological Sciences (1-2 Cr.)


    Directed reading allows a student to pursue an area of special interest not covered by a formal course by designing, in collaboration with the instructor, readings tailored to the topic. Prerequisites: BIO 101  and/or BIO 102  and appropriate 200-level courses. Permission of the instructor and approval of the program are required. Fall semester, repeated spring semester.
  
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    BIO 290 - Internship in Biological Sciences (0-4 Cr.)


    Typical internships include positions in university, government, or industrial research laboratories, medical or veterinary practices, zoos, botanical gardens, the National Aquarium in Baltimore, and oceanographic research vessels. Prerequisites: BIO 101  or BIO 102  and appropriate 200-level courses. Graded pass/no pass only. Variable semesters.
  
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    BIO 291 - Directed Research in the Biological Sciences (1-2 Cr.)


    Under the direction of a program faculty member, students conduct laboratory or field research. Students initially write a brief research plan, outlining major goals of the research project. Upon completion of the research, students submit a report written in the form of a journal article to the faculty sponsor. The course may be repeated once with the same, or a different, faculty member. Only two credits of directed research may be counted toward the 38-credit total for the biology major. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or permission of the program. Students who wish to be considered for honors within the biology major must complete an appropriate senior independent research course. Fall semester, spring semester, summer.
  
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    BIO 324 - Advanced Molecular Biology (4 Cr.)


    Topics include construction of recombinant DNA molecules; recombinant protein expression, purification and characterization and structure-function characterization; gene expression analyses; analysis of protein-protein interactions, enzymes and metabolism. The course also provides basic training in the use of bioinformatics tools to “mine” Web-based data on a variety of levels and alternate years. Three hours classroom, three hours laboratory. Prerequisites: BIO 220  and BIO 224 . Fall semester. Offered 2018-19 and alternate years.
  
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    BIO 327 - Advanced Genetics (4 Cr.)

    (GCR DA-AC)
    This course provides an understanding of the control and expression of genes at the molecular level with an emphasis on eukaryotic systems. Topics focus on genetic analyses of selected model systems, including Drosophila, S. cerevisiae, C. elegans, and human. Student participation and use of original literature are emphasized. Three hours classroom, three hours laboratory. Prerequisites: BIO 210 BIO 220 , and BIO 224 . Fall semester. Offered 2019-20 and alternate years. Hiller.
  
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    BIO 333 - Plant Physiology (4 Cr.)


    Examination of factors influencing the growth and development of plants (water; mineral nutrients; hormones and chemical regulators; and environmental factors such as temperature, gravity, and light). Also included are biochemical and molecular aspects of important metabolic processes, such as photosynthesis and nitrogen fixation. Three hours classroom, three hours laboratory. Prerequisites: BIO 210  and BIO 220 .
  
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    BIO 340 - Ecology and Evolution (4 Cr.)

    (formerly BIO 240) (LER ENV)(GCR ENV)
    The distinctive features of diverse terrestrial and aquatic habitats are examined to discover how they affect individual, population, and community processes. Ecological and evolutionary theory is used to explore the relationships between structure and function in ecosystems, and current models are used to probe the nature of population growth and its regulation. Special emphasis will be placed on environmental sustainability and how climate changes and other human induced activities may impact the ecology of organisms. The mechanisms of evolution are illustrated using examples from population genetics, speciation, and co-evolution. Four hours classroom. Prerequisite: BIO 220 . Fall semester. Kicklighter.
  
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    BIO 345 - Advanced Ecology (4 Cr.)


    This course will build on general concepts of ecology and will include a focus on more specialized topics, such as animal behavior, chemical ecology, urban ecology, agroecology, and impacts of climate change. Both field and laboratory techniques will be applied to terrestrial and aquatic organisms and will include an emphasis on species identification, methods of quantification, and statistical analysis. Lab activities will include weekend/fall break field trips. Pre- or corequisite: BIO 340 . Kicklighter.
  
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    BIO 354 - Microbiology (4 Cr.)

    (GCR DA-AC)
    An introduction to the structure, physiology, genetics, ecology, and the evolution of microorganisms. Special attention is given to the role of microbes in industry and in infectious diseases. Chemotherapeutic and immune control of infectious diseases are also discussed in detail. Three hours classroom, three hours laboratory. Prerequisites: BIO 210 , BIO 220 , BIO 224  and CHE 230  , and completion of GCR Data Analytics Foundational Level. Spring 2018-19 and alternate years. Jozwick.
  
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    BIO 360 - Principles of Physiology (4 Cr.)

    (formerly BIO 260)
    Systems approach to the physiological processes of the body, emphasizing humans, including nerve, muscle, circulation, respiration, osmoregulation, endocrine, acid-base balance, and metabolism. Laboratory work introduces standard methods used in physiological investigations and emphasizes data interpretation with regard to known physiological mechanisms. Three hours classroom, three hours laboratory. Prerequisites: BIO 210 .  Fall semester. Staff.
  
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    BIO 362 - Endocrinology (4 Cr.)


    A study of the vertebrate endocrine system. Topics include endocrine gland morphology, hormone syntheses and biochemistry, and hormonal regulation of physiological function with particular regard to growth, metabolism, reproduction, and electrolyte balance. Neuroendocrinology and mechanisms of hormone action are also considered in detail. Four hours classroom. Prerequisites: BIO 210 , BIO 224 , and BIO 360 .
  
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    BIO 378 - Developmental Biology (4 Cr.)

    (GCR DA-AC)
    The environment in which an organism develops can greatly impact the developmental outcome of the organism, health of the fully developed or aged organism, and evolution of organisms. This course explores the plasticity of developmental mechanisms and processes, how the environment can disrupt development, and developmental bases for evolutionary change in the context of classic developmental biology knowledge. Three hours classroom, three hours laboratory. Prerequisites: BIO 210 , BIO 220 , and BIO 224  ; and completion of GCR Data Analytics Foundation Level requirement. Spring 2019-20. Lenkowski.
  
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    BIO 380 - Directed Reading in Biological Sciences (1 or 2 Cr.)


    Reading program designed in consultation with an instructor in an area not covered by formal course work. Directed reading at the 300 level would require integration and critical evaluation of current literature well beyond that required work for BIO 280-BIO 289. Prerequisites: appropriate 00-level and/or 300-level courses, permission of instructor, and approval of the program. Fall semester, repeated spring semester.
  
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    BIO 420 - Seminar in Neurobiology (2 Cr.)

    (formerly BIO 320)
    This seminar will focus on how nervous systems develop and function. Topics will include developmental neurobiology, function of the central nervous system, regeneration, and diseases of the central nervous system. Through critical analysis of primary scientific literature, students will become familiar with study systems, experimental methods used, and current knowledge in the field of neurobiology. Lectures, discussions, and student presentations. Prerequisite: BIO 220 . Lenkowski.
  
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    BIO 445 - Seminar: Biochemistry of Gene Expression (2 Cr.)

    (formerly CHE 345)
    The development of many powerful biotechnologies, such as PCR, RNAi and CRISPR - to name only a few - grew out of basic research into the biochemical mechanisms of gene expression. Many of these technologies have important medical, societal and environmental applications, and furthermore their development has contributed to great advancements in basic research. This seminar will focus on recent scientific progress beyond “textbook” understanding of the machinery of gene expression, and explore the synergistic relationship between basic research and biotechnology, through the study of primary literature, discussions and student presentations. Prerequisite: BIO 220 . Levine.
  
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    BIO 454 - Seminar in Infectious Diseases (2 Cr.)


    This seminar offers a critical analysis of current scientific research on the evolution and treatment of infectious diseases. Students will examine our understanding of viral, bacterial, protozoan and fungal pathogens and their interactions with the host immune system through discussion and presentation of primary literature. Prerequisite: BIO 220 . Jozwick.
  
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    BIO 456 - Seminar in Microbial Mutualism (2 Cr.)

    (formerly BIO 356)
    This seminar will critically examine the current research on microbial associations with plants and animals, emphasizing beneficial contributions. Through discussions of recent primary literature, students will explore the role of microbial partners in a range of topics such as agriculture, evolution, organismal development and human health.  Prerequisite: BIO 220 . Jozwick.
  
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    BIO 474 - Seminar in Mechanisms of Aging and Cancer (2 Cr.)

    (formerly BIO 374)
    Investigation into the current understanding of biochemical processes that underlie progressive aging in humans. Topics include the evolution of senescence, the genetic and environmental components of aging-related diseases such as Alzheimer’s and cancer, and the implications of current research that is aimed at improving the quality and longevity of human life. Lectures, discussions, and student presentations.  Prerequisites: BIO 210  and BIO 220  or CHE 341. Spring semester. Levine.
 

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