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    Goucher College
   
 
  Oct 19, 2017
 
 
    
Goucher College 2015-2016 Undergraduate Catalogue [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

General Academic Information



Organization of the Curriculum

Humanities Division

Communication and Media Studies
English
Hispanic Languages, Literatures, and Cultures
History
Modern Languages, Literatures, and Cultures
Philosophy and Religion
World Literature

Social Sciences Division

Business Management
Economics
Education
Political Science and International Relations
Prelaw Studies
Sociology and Anthropology
Special Education

Natural Sciences and Mathematics Division

Biological Sciences
Chemistry
Mathematics and Computer Science
Physics and Astronomy
Premedical Studies
Psychology

Arts Division

Art and Art History
Arts Administration
Dance
Music
Theatre

Interdisciplinary Studies Division

Africana Studies
American Studies
Cognitive Studies
Environmental Studies Program
European Studies
Individualized Interdisciplinary Major
Judaic Studies
Peace Studies
Public Health Program

Theory, Culture, and Interpretation Minors

Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Interinstitutional Program

B.A./B.S. Science and Engineering Program- Goucher College/Johns Hopkins University

B.A./B.S. Science and Engineering Program - Goucher College/ Columbia University

Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts Degree

One hundred twenty (120) credit hours are required for the degree. A student must achieve a of minimum 2.0 cumulative GPA and a minimum grade of C- in each course that is counted toward fulfilling the requirements of the major. Credit hours at Goucher are defined on a semester basis, as distinct from a trimester or quarter basis. Candidates for the degree must complete a minimum of 60 credit hours at Goucher College.

Residency Requirement

Twelve of the last 24 credit hours must be completed at Goucher unless granted an exception with the approval of the major department and the associate dean for undergraduate studies. Exceptions may be granted for approved summer courses and study-abroad programs or other programs. These approved non-Goucher credits shall ordinarily be completed within two semesters following the petition date to avoid withdrawal from the college. Contact the Registrar’s Office for approval of specific non-Goucher courses.

 

Liberal Education Requirements (LER)

All students are provided with an academic plan available via their myGoucher account. Please be aware that some requirements have an option “A” and option “B”. Students only have to satisfy either option “A” or option “B”, but not both.

Ways of Knowing & Understanding the World

Goucher College is dedicated to a liberal arts education that prepares students within a broad, humane perspective for a life of inquiry, creativity, and critical and analytical thinking. Students develop an international outlook, extending liberal arts education beyond Western cultures to encompass the perspectives and achievements of other members of the world community. To achieve this education, students must explore different ways of knowing and understanding the world by completing at least one course in each of the following areas. Courses designated for more than one requirement may satisfy a maximum of two requirements.

  (Frontiers, College Writing Proficiency, Foreign Language)
  (Social Sciences, Natural Sciences, Mathematical Reasoning, Artistic/Creative Expression, Textual Analysis & Critical Perspectives, Understanding Diverse Perspectives, and Environmental Sustainability)
  

ED 272Y  (LER-DIV). If the topic allows the course to fulfill the requirement, it will be posted in the Registration Guidebook for that semester.

Students in exceptional circumstance may appeal to the Curriculum Committee for consideration of 300- level courses to fulfill a Liberal Education Requirement. Please contact the Registrar for further information before appealing to the Curriculum Committee.

Other Liberal Education Requirements

  1. One hundred twenty (120) credit hours are required for the degree. A student must achieve a minimum 2.0 cumulative grade point average and a minimum grade of C- in each course that is counted toward fulfilling the requirements of the major. Credit hours at Goucher are defined on a semester basis, as distinct from a trimester or quarter basis. Candidates for the degree must complete a minimum of 60 credit hours at Goucher College.
  2. Connections is a required first-semester course that continues the orientation process and helps students as they draw connections between what goes on inside the classroom and experiences in life outside of class. First-year students are introduced to people and resources throughout the Goucher community that can be used as navigational tools as they get acquainted with the college. They also begin to form a learning community in which participants come to know one another, develop a sense of respect for different viewpoints, and learn the value of individual responsibility and accountability. All incoming first-year students must pass this course to be eligible for graduation with the exception of Goucher II students, who are exempt from this requirement.
  3. Goucher students, including those who transfer to the college, are required to complete one physical education activity course by the end of the junior year. Students who successfully complete a season on a varsity team, a dance performance through the Dance Department, some (but not all) dance courses, or a riding course may use that experience to satisfy the requirement. Goucher does not recognize audits or unsupervised activity as a substitute for course work in physical education. Students with a gap of five years or more in their continuous education, or those over the age of 25, are exempt from the physical education requirements but are encouraged to enroll in or audit any physical education course.

College Writing Proficiency

All students are expected to achieve writing proficiency, which is evaluated twice during their college career. College writing proficiency (CWP) is taught and assessed through the Writing Program. The achievement of CWP signifies that students have learned to write clear and coherent academic prose, and can conduct modern scholarly library research. Students achieve writing proficiency in the major through courses designated by individual departments. These courses insure that students have mastered the particular genres, analytical methods, and styles of their majors.

All incoming first-year students must take the directed self-placement quiz on the first-year portal. Students who wish to be considered for the honors section must submit a graded essay to the Writing Program Director.

Transfer students should submit a portfolio of academic writing to the Director of the Writing Program, who will offer individual guidance.

Each first-year student will be placed in either WRT 181  or WRT 181H , the Writing Studies courses. Students who would like additional writing support must also enroll in WRT 101A  in the fall and WRT 101B  in the spring.

Students may take WRT 181  in the fall or the spring.

Students in need of additional support as they make the transition to college-level writing and analysis will be placed into a fall section of WRT 181, plus two Studio for Writers courses, WRT 101A (fall) and 101B (spring).

In their second year, students will complete a Writing-Enriched Curriculum (WEC) course.  WEC courses will be offered through the Writing Program as well as by individual departments.

Upon completion of the WEC course, each student will submit a portfolio of academic writing (three college-level papers plus a questionnaire) to the Director of the Writing Program.  College Writing Proficiency will be determined, on the basis of the portfolio, by a committee of writing instructors.

Writing Enriched Curriculum (WEC) and College Writing Proficiency (CWP) 

WEC courses use writing intentionally and creatively to enhance students’ learning. Students who entered Goucher College in FA15 or later must take a WEC course in any discipline.   Ideally, you will take this course during your second year at Goucher.  Please note that we are continuing to add WEC courses; the following list will help you choose.  The Writing Program will offer many WEC courses, including seven sections of WRT 281 in SP17. 

After you complete WRT 181 and a WEC course in any discipline, you may apply to earn College Writing Proficiency (CWP).  CWP is a requirement for graduation at Goucher.  Please look for the Call for CWP Submissions early in SP17.  At that time, you will be invited to submit a portfolio of your writing. 

If you have questions, please contact Phaye Poliakoff-Chen (phaye.poliakoff-chen@goucher.edu), the Writing Program Director. 

WEC Courses for 2016-17 as of March 2016

BIO 214 Techniques in Cell Biology

BUS 206 Business and Professional Writing (cross-listed with WRT 206)

COM 132 Writing for Film, Television, and Radio

HIS/ANT 238  Cultures of Contemporary Europe

HIS 210 (formerly HIS 110) Survey: Early American History

HIS 211 (formerly HIS 111) Survey: Modern American History, Culture

HIS 213 (formerly HIS 113) Survey: Becoming East Asia

HIS 216 (formerly HIS 116) Survey: Europe, Classical to 1789

HIS 217 (formerly HIS 117) Survey: Modern Europe, 1789-Present

HIS 225 (formerly HIS 125) Survey: Latin America: The Colonial Period

HIS 210 (formerly HP 110) Preserving our Heritage

PSY 219 Black Psychology (Fall)

PSY 226 Relational Psychology (Spring)

WRT 221 Theories and Practices in Composing, Tutoring, and Teaching

WRT 219  Linguistics

WRT 281 Writing Studies II: Special Topics, including Writing and Community Engagement (SP17); Comics, Composition and Creativity (FA16); Islamophobia and Rhetoric (SP17); The Medical Narrative (SP17) 

WRT 206  Business and Professional Writing (Cross-listed with BUS 206)

Foreign Language Proficiency

Competence in a foreign language is an integral part of a liberal arts education. Foreign language training has broad cultural implications and develops skills necessary for many careers. All students are required to complete the intermediate level of a foreign language. A minimum grade of C- is required to progress from one language level to another. Students taking a 130-level language course pass/no pass who achieve class scores lower than 70 percent must take the course again. A student may not fulfill the foreign language requirement by auditing a course. A student may not take any of the 100-level language courses (110, 120, or 130) as an independent study in the Departments of Modern Languages, Literatures & Cultures, Hispanic Languages, Literatures & Cultures, or the Judaic Studies program.

Students must receive at least a C- in the 110 and 120 foreign language courses in order to enroll in the next course. A student may not re-take the placement test and place into 120 or 130 after having stayed enrolled in the 110 or 120 course past the add/drop date. Students failing to receive a grade of at least C- or Pass in the 110 or 120 course must re-enroll in that course and achieve a C- or Pass before enrolling in the subsequent 120 or 130 course. A grade of “D” or better is required in a 130 course to complete the foreign language requirement.

Students who are foreign nationals and native speakers and writers of a language other than English may be exempted from the foreign language requirement if they provide evidence of their proficiency. Documents serving as evidence include a high school diploma from a school where English is not the primary language, a note from a high school teacher or college faculty member from the student’s home country attesting to the student’s native-level proficiency in the language, or a placement test score indicating that the student is beyond the level of 130 language courses at Goucher. Exceptionally well-prepared students in the languages offered at Goucher College may be exempted on recommendation of the Modern Languages and Literatures Department; Hispanic Languages, Literature, and Cultures Department; or through a placement test (required of all entering students).

Students intending to complete the foreign language proficiency out of residence must obtain prior approval from the Modern Languages and Literatures Department or Hispanic Languages, Literature, and Cultures Department and complete a minimum of 12 credits (or the terminal course in a 12-credit series). A minimum grade of C- is required for all transfer courses. If a student intends to fulfill any portion of the foreign language requirement abroad, written approval by both the Modern Languages and Literatures Department or Hispanic Languages, Literature, and Cultures Department and the Office of International Studies is required prior to departure. Students may be required to demonstrate proficiency upon return to campus. Students participating in summer and winter intensive foreign language programs other than those run by Goucher faculty will also need prior approval if they are seeking Goucher credit. Foreign languages not offered at Goucher College will be accepted provided that students fulfill the same requirements as those for languages offered at Goucher. Students must notify the chair of the Modern Languages and Literature Department or Hispanic Languages, Literature, and Cultures Department of their intentions to fulfill their language requirement at another institution and complete a form specifically designed for this purpose (available online). Results of placement tests taken at institutions in the area must be sent to the chair of the Modern Languages and Literatures Department or Hispanic Languages, Literature, and Cultures Department..

The Modern Languages and Literatures Department or Hispanic Languages, Literature, and Cultures Department will evaluate transfer credits of foreign language courses taken at another institution on an individual basis. Ordinarily, if a student submits transfer credits at the beginner and/or intermediate level with a grade of C- or above and is placed in the first semester of a language, no transfer credit will be given; if placed in the second semester of a language, up to four transfer credits could be given; if placed in the third semester of a language, up to eight transfer credits could be given. For students who place out of Goucher College’s intermediate level, up to 12 transfer credits could be given and the language liberal education requirement will be fulfilled. In order to ensure timely completion of the foreign language requirement, students need to begin to study a language during their first year. Transfer students who enter as sophomores or higher should begin to study a foreign language immediately. For all students, unless there are extenuating circumstances, the final course to satisfy the foreign language requirement should not be attempted in the fall semester of the senior year.

Study Abroad

All students are expected to make a good faith effort to complete the study abroad requirement. Students who cannot complete the study abroad requirement may petition the associate provost for international studies for an exemption. Students who are granted an exemption will be required to substitute a three or four-credit off-campus experience to satisfy this requirement. All transfer students who have studied abroad (for which at least three credits are accepted by Goucher) will have satisfied the study abroad requirement upon enrollment. Thus, no travel voucher will be issued to these students, even if they undertake subsequent international study.

As with all college-level work completed elsewhere, final approval of credits for study abroad work completed before enrollment at Goucher must be confirmed by the registrar after a review of a final, official transcript. The registrar will also confirm whether the work approved for credit at Goucher satisfies any academic requirements, including the study abroad requirement.

Students may study abroad on Goucher ICAs (intensive courses abroad), Goucher short-term or non-Goucher short-term programs at any time during their undergraduate experience, provided that they obtain approval from their advisors and the OIS. Students pursuing semester or yearlong study-abroad programs must have spent at least three semesters in residence at an accredited college or university. Students may fulfill the study abroad requirement by pursuing an international internship for at least three credits. Students choosing to fulfill the requirement with an internship must work with the CDO, their advisers, and the OIS.

Generally, students can carry their institutional financial aid abroad on Goucher semester programs for only one semester, except in the cases of the Goucher Oxford Program. Students cannot carry their institutional financial aid on any non-Goucher semester-abroad programs, but can carry any federal aid such as Pell Grants or Stafford Loans.

Policy on Goucher Financial Aid for Second semester program:

Students pursuing a major or minor in a foreign language, Peace Studies or International Relations with a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.00, who are interested in carrying their institutional financial aid for a second semester of languages study on a Goucher language immersion program (or in the case of Peace Studies and International Relations, on a program where the student will take at least three credits of a foreign language) must submit a petition to the chair of one of the following departments: Hispanic Languages, Literatures and Cultures, Modern Languages, Literatures and Cultures, the Peace Studies Program, or Political Science/International Relations. The petition deadline, due in OIS, is the second Friday of the semester. Students will need to submit petitions to department Chairs in advance of the deadline, in order for departments to send in their recommendation. There are a maximum of six petitions accepted each year.

Study-Abroad Policy for International Students

All students are expected to make a good-faith effort to complete the study abroad requirement. However, students who are citizens of a country other than the United States and whose primary residence is in that country may petition the associate provost for international studies for an exemption from the requirement. Students who are granted an exemption will be required to substitute a minimum three-credit off-campus academic experience in lieu of the study abroad requirement.

Financial Aid for International Study

Students enrolled in a study-abroad program may apply for a Goucher loan up to a maximum of $2000 and are subject to the terms of this agreement. Federal financial aid does not apply to summer or January intersession study abroad programs.

Scholarships for International Study

Scholarships for study abroad are available through the Office of International Studies. These include:

 

The Constance R. Caplan ‘57 Scholarship Fund

The Michele and Marty Cohen P’10 Scholarship Fund

The Rosa and Herman Cohen Scholarship

The Suzanne Fineman Cohen ‘56 international Scholars Fund

The Klara Farkas P’66 and Georgette Farkas Balance ‘66 Scholarship Fund

The Josephine Levy Kohn ‘36 Scholarship Fund

The Hajime Mitarai Memorial Fund

The Leslie Savage Nelson Mahoney 1912 Scholarship (for study at Oxford University)

The Katherine Manning-Munce 1919 Scholarship Fund

The Phyllis Koller Schreter ‘43 Fund for Study Abroad

The Selz Foundation Scholarship Fund

The Louise Scholl Tuttle ‘36 Scholarship Fund for Foreign Language Study

The Ungar Family Endowed Study-Abroad Fund

The Carol Fain Walters ‘57 Scholarship

The David and Marilyn Southard Warshawsky ‘68 Scholarship

The Margaret Messler Winslow ‘69 Fund for International Education

Scholarships for summer international internships are available from the Career Development Office (CDO).

 

Study-Abroad Deposits

Students studying abroad on Goucher semester programs must submit a non-refundable deposit. The amount of this deposit varies by program, so please consult the OIS to learn about specific program deposit amount and deadline dates.

Students participating in ICAs must pay a $50 application fee and a non-refundable $500 program deposit. Specific program deadlines are set each semester by the Office of International Studies. Students planning to undertake a non-Goucher short term course must pay a $100 administrative fee.

Refunds

If for any reason, a student withdraws from a Goucher semester or short-term program after the deposit deadline (or, the deadline of our partner institutions), he or she will not be entitled to a refund of any fees paid to Goucher, including program deposit, tuition fees, travel fees, program fees, or any other fees incurred in connection with the program. If, due to any unforeseen circumstances or other circumstances beyond the control of the college, a semester or short-term Goucher program is cancelled, either prior to departure or during the course of the program, the student will not be guaranteed a refund of any fees paid to Goucher, including program deposit, tuition fees, travel fees, program fees, or any other fees incurred in connection with the program. In most cases, the college forwards program fees to vendors in foreign countries, making it very difficult to recover such fees due to a program cancellation. In such cases, the college will make a good-faith effort to recover such fees and to return any portion of fees that it may recover that may be attributable to a student’s participation in the program. However, the college makes no guarantees regarding the recovery of fees and is not liable for any fees that it is unable to recover.

Physical Education Requirements

Goucher students, including those who transfer to the college, are required to complete a physical education activity course by the end of the junior year. Students who successfully complete a season on a varsity team, a dance performance through the Dance Department, some (but not all) dance courses, or a riding course may use that experience to satisfy the activity component. Goucher does not recognize audits or unsupervised activity as a substitute for course work in physical education. Students with physical education or health science transfer credits on an official transcript from another college may be able to satisfy all or part of Goucher’s physical education requirement. These students should submit course syllabus, catalogue description, or certification document for consideration. Students with a gap of five years or more in their continuous education, or those over the age of 25, are exempt from the physical education requirements but are encouraged to enroll in or audit any physical education course.

The PE and Dance (DAN) courses approved for this requirement can be found at the following link:

Physical Education Activity  

 

Frontiers First Year Seminars

The Frontiers First Year Seminar program introduces students to the pleasures and demands of the liberal arts and sciences and initiates them into the rich academic life of the Goucher College community. Taught by faculty from across the disciplines, each Frontiers seminar draws on the passions, expertise, and creative interests of an enthusiastic professor to investigate cutting edge material from multiple points of view. In these seminars, students develop analytic and synthetic thinking skills and explore different perspectives through which to examine assumptions. Class discussions are enriched by community and creative projects, guest speakers, field trips, and hands-on investigations. Goucher’s first-year seminars foster independent thought, student responsibility, intellectual curiosity, collaborative inquiry, and the joy of active learning. Goucher II students who enter as first-year students are required to enroll in Frontiers. ISP 110 and ISP 110Y  taken in the fall semester fulfill the Frontiers requirement. All incoming first-year students are required to pass FRO 100, FRO 120, ISP 110 or ISP 110Y  to be eligible for graduation. Individual course listings are available through the First Year Portal and on the Goucher College website.

First Year Experience (FYE 134)

FYE is a required course for all new students that continues the orientation process and helps students as they draw connections between what goes on inside the classroom and experiences in life outside of class. All new students are introduced to people and resources throughout the Goucher community that can be used as navigational tools as they get acquainted with the college. They also begin to form a learning community in which participants come to know one another, develop a sense of respect for different viewpoints, and learn the value of individual responsibility and accountability. All new students must pass this course to be eligible for graduation with the exception of Goucher II students, who are exempt from this requirement.

The Major

Completion of a major is a requirement for the degree. Students are required to declare a major in the second semester of the sophomore year and may choose a major earlier if they are certain of their academic focus. The major enables students to study one or more disciplines in depth. No course may be counted toward requirements for the major unless a grade of C- or higher is earned. Courses elected with a pass/no pass option will not count toward requirements for the major unless such courses are graded on a pass/no pass option only.

Students must complete a writing requirement in the major and fulfill the requirements for the major, minor, or concentration that are in effect at the time they declare. Students entering Goucher in Fall 1997 and after will meet the computer proficiency requirement through their declared major.

A student’s major may be designated in any of the following patterns:

Departmental Major

The student follows a program outlined by a particular department for at least 30 credit hours of which at least nine credit hours should be at the 300 level.

Double Major

The student fulfills all the requirements for the major in two departments.

Individualized Interdisciplinary Major

The individualized major is for students whose interdisciplinary interests are not met by an existing interdisciplinary program. The individualized major falls under the jurisdiction of Division V and must be supervised by an interdisciplinary committee composed of a faculty sponsor and at least two other faculty members. The student must meet with the director of individualized interdisciplinary major early in the sophomore year in order to formulate the intended major and must declare the major by spring pre-registration of the sophomore year. The individualized major must include 45 credits at the 200/300 level.

The Minor

Students may select a departmental or interdisciplinary minor in addition to the major. The departmental minor shall be composed of six courses on the 200 and 300 level (18 to 24 credits, depending on the course selection). Departments are encouraged to list a core for the minor; at least 50 percent of the courses should be core. At least one course in the minor should be at the 300 level. A selection of appropriate electives may be designated by the individual departments. The interdisciplinary minor may require eight courses (24 to 32 credits). Students must fulfill all the criteria for the minor. No course may be counted toward the requirements for a minor unless a grade of C- or higher is earned. Courses elected with a pass/no pass option will not count toward requirements for the minor unless such courses are graded on a pass/no pass option only.

The Concentration

Students may select a departmental or interdisciplinary concentration in addition to the major and must meet all the criteria for the concentration. Concentrations are not available in all departments or disciplines. As with the major and minor, no course may be counted toward the requirements for a concentration unless a grade of C- or higher is earned. Courses elected with a pass/no pass option will not count toward requirements for the concentration unless such courses are graded on a pass/no pass option only.

Other Academic Opportunities

Independent Work

With the permission of the instructor and the department chair involved, a degree candidate may pursue independent study beginning with the second semester of the first year. Ordinarily, a student may not register for more than two independent studies per semester. No more than 16 credits of independent study may be applied toward the 120 credits required for graduation. Also, the Senior Thesis is considered as independent work and therefore is counted as part of the 16 credit maximum applied to the 120 credits required for graduation.

The Senior Thesis

The senior thesis is the product of scholarly or scientific research or artistic work of high academic quality. The character of the work leading to the senior thesis is expected to be more advanced than normal course work and should involve an unusually high level of initiative, independence, organization, and effort. It is used by many departments as one criterion for selecting students who are awarded honors in the major. The thesis is also part of the scholarly record of the college. Senior thesis work carries eight credits and ordinarily involves two sequential courses of four semester credit hours each, directed by a faculty adviser selected by the student. The adviser and the thesis subject are ordinarily in the student’s major field. Students must present a proposal for a senior thesis during their junior year. They will qualify to register for senior thesis work after completion of a minimum of 87 semester hours of college credit. Students must have a minimum GPA of 3.50 in the major field(s) and 3.25 overall. They should also be making normal progress toward completion of all requirements in the major(s). When a student is double majoring and both departments require a thesis for honors, it is up to each department whether one thesis will be allowed to count toward both honors. Also, the Senior Thesis is considered as independent work and therefore is counted as part of the 16 credit maximum applied to the 120 credits required for graduation. The complete guidelines and appropriate forms can be found at the following website: www.goucher.edu/x1893.xml

International Scholars Program

The International Scholars Program (ISP) is open to all incoming first-year students. When elected in a student’s first year, the first-semester seminar will substitute for a Frontiers course. The program consists of one full-year seminar, a second four-credit seminar, and a senior roundtable that is required but carries no credit. The seminars offer multidisciplinary perspectives on the contemporary global condition, and they are designed to complement any major or academic program of study. In addition to course work on campus, students are required to study abroad. Typically, students will travel abroad for a semester or year after completing the first two seminars. This could happen as early as the second semester of their sophomore year or as late as the first semester of their senior year.

Adequate language proficiency will provide students the necessary tools to engage in meaningful exchanges and make the most of a genuine immersion experience when participating in the study-abroad component of the program. Language proficiency for this program is defined as a basic mastery of the four language-learning skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students are strongly recommended to complete at least one additional semester of language training beyond the level of college proficiency, but will not be required to do so unless mandated by the study-abroad program they select.

Academic Internships

Academic credit for internships will remain an important and valuable opportunity for all students and is required for some majors. Students who wish to complete an internship for academic credit must do the following:

  • Submit a completed internship learning agreement to the CDO for approval by the established deadline
  • Develop learning goals at the beginning of their internship
  • Reflect on their learning through journals, papers, and other academic work with guidance from faculty sponsors
  • Complete an evaluation of their experience at the end of the semester

Each department has established internship courses with distinct prerequisites and academic requirements. All internships must adhere to the policies outlined by the college. Credit will not be awarded for previously completed work or internship experiences. Academic internships are available for almost every major and during every semester. Although the CDO provides resources to assist students throughout the process, students must take an active role in arranging their internship. The CDO also coordinates the Goucher Intern Fellowship Program that competitively awards funds to students pursuing summer internships. The purpose of the fellowships is to encourage students to participate in academic internships for credit over the summer by supplementing their expenses. To learn more about these fellowships, please refer to the CDO website at www.goucher.edu/cdo.

Tuition for Academic Internships

Students will pay per credit for internships occurring in the summer or during winter break. Refer to the fees and expenses section of the catalogue for additional information about charges for academic internships. 

Internship Policies

The following policies have been established to clarify how students are awarded credit and to address issues relating to registration for internship credit. These guidelines have been developed to provide a framework for the internship process and to clearly delineate the roles and expectations for all involved in the internship program:

1.   Three internship credits will be earned for a minimum of 90 hours of internship experience and four internship credits will be earned for a minimum of 120 hours of internship experience.

2.   Students may earn a total of eight internship credits toward graduation. Students participating in more than eight internship credits will not be able to apply additional credits towards graduation.

3.   Credit can be awarded only when the internship experience coincides with the semester that the student registers for such credit.

4.   For domestic internships, students may complete only one internship (up to four credits) per semester.

5.   Variable credit (1 credit to 6 credits) may be awarded to students completing international internships on a petition basis, when approved by the Career Development Office (CDO) and the Office of International Studies (OIS).

6.   Students may complete more than one internship at a site, but the responsibilities and academic work involved in the internship must be different in order for additional credit to be earned.

7.   Students are not permitted to audit an academic internship course.

8.   Students must complete an evaluation of their internship experience at the end of each semester and return it to the CDO by the deadline.

9.   A student’s internship site supervisor and faculty internship sponsor must be different people.

10.   The faculty internship sponsor must be from the academic department in which the internship credit will be awarded.

International Internships

Students may expand their knowledge and understanding of unique cultures and people by completing an international internship. Students must contact the offices of International Studies and Career Development to receive specific information on securing international internships. There are three options for international academic internships:

1.   Academic internships embedded in Goucher sponsored study-abroad programs (see the Office of International Studies for more information on Goucher-sponsored programs).

2.   Academic internships embedded in approved non-Goucher study-abroad programs (see the Office of International Studies for more information on approved non-Goucher programs).

3.   Independent international academic internships-a student can create his/her own internships in the country of choice based on interests and areas of study provided the following conditions are met:

·Students must have previous study or work experience abroad that has prepared them to live independently in another country.

·Prior to departure, students must sign a waiver of liability provided by the Office of International Studies.

·Students must speak with OIS, their academic adviser, and the CDO for final approval. Students must comply with all policies governing internship credit, and must complete and submit paperwork to the OIS.

· Students must attend a mandatory pre-departure orientation conducted by an OIS staff member. OIS must sign the ILA prior to the internship being approved for academic credit.

·Students must be enrolled full-time during the previous semester.

Science and Engineering Program

Goucher College has established a dual-degree program through which students earn both a bachelor of arts degree from Goucher and a bachelor of science degree from the G.W.C. Whiting School of Engineering of the Johns Hopkins University. The purpose of the dual-degree program is to enable students to explore the liberal arts and sciences while developing professional knowledge and experience in a specific field of engineering.

Graduate Credits

4+1 Bachelor of Arts/Master of Arts Programs

 

 

The Welch Center offers accelerated 4+1 degree programs in which student can earn both the Bachelor of Arts degree and a Masters in just five years in Cultural Sustainability, Digital Arts, Education, Environmental Studies, and Management.

Through these programs, students who have at least a 3.0 grade point average and who have attained junior status may take up to nine graduate credits while they are still undergraduates. These nine graduate credits apply to the 120 credits required for the bachelor’s degree, as well as to the credits required for the master’s degree. The 4+1 programs typically require two to three summers of coursework. Information on the programs is available at the relevant program website at: http://www.goucher.edu/graduate-programs

Baltimore Student Exchange Program/Interinstitutional Programs

Participation in the Baltimore Student Exchange Program (BSEP) that includes Coppin State University, Johns Hopkins University, Loyola College, Maryland Institute College of Art, Morgan State University, Notre Dame of Maryland University, Peabody Institute, Towson University, University of Baltimore, University of Maryland Baltimore County, and Stevenson University is open to full-time sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Courses in the day programs of the neighboring institutions are part of the reciprocal arrangement. Ordinarily, a Goucher student may take only two courses per year at the other institutions. Courses not duplicated at Goucher are open to election, although visiting students may not displace a student of the host institution in courses where places are limited. Independent work and special tutorial courses may not be taken at another institution. Interinstitutional courses are not open to pass/no pass election. Class schedules of participating colleges are available on the respective colleges’ websites. Complete regulations and registration procedures may be obtained from the Office of the Registrar in Student Administrative Services or on the web at: www.goucher.edu/x16965.xml. Goucher students who participate in the interinstitutional program pay Goucher tuition fees. Any exceptional charges are paid by the student directly to the host college. Students are responsible for their transportation to and from other colleges. There is limited shuttle service to some of the interinstitutional colleges and universities.

Summer Study

Students who wish to obtain credit for work taken at another institution during the summer must have their course elections approved by their advisers and the Office of the Registrar, acting on behalf of the provost. If the course requested is from a department other than that of the advisor, and the course is not similar in context to a listed Goucher course the approval of that department is required. Only 15 credit hours of summer or January intersession work are applicable to the degree.

Only credits with grades of C- or higher will be accepted (or C or higher if completed prior to June 2010).

Air Force ROTC

Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps (AFROTC) is available to Goucher students through a (cross-town agreement) agreement with the University of Maryland College Park (UMCP). AFROTC courses are scheduled so students from Goucher may complete all AFROTC requirements during one morning (Thursday) per week at the College Park campus. In addition, students are eligible to compete for all AFROTC scholarship programs. The three-year and two year scholarships pay tuition, books, and a monthly stipend while in school. Students must maintain a 2.0 GPA to participate in the program and a 2.5 GPA if on ROTC scholarship. You must have at least 5 semesters of college remaining and must be under age 31 when you commission. After graduation and successful completion of AFROTC requirements, students are commissioned as second lieutenants in the Air Force. Students interested in AFROTC should visit the detachment website: (http://www.afrotc.umd.edu/), call at 301-314-3242, or visit in person at:

AFROTC Detachment 330
University of Maryland
Cole Field House
2126 Campus Drive
College Park, MD 20742-4321

Army ROTC

Goucher accepts Army ROTC Scholarships as part of the college’s association with the Army ROTC program at Loyola College. Interested students should contact Captain Sarah Bennett at Loyola at 410-617-5179 (srbennett@loyola.edu)

Academic Procedures

Academic Responsibilities

In fulfilling their academic responsibilities, students are granted a degree of autonomy commensurate with their obligations to the social and academic communities. Students’ academic obligations and responsibilities include regular class attendance and systematic preparation in all phases of their work. Any student who must be absent from class for a disproportionate amount of time due to illness may be advised to withdraw from class.

Academic Honor Code

The cornerstone of Goucher’s academic community is the Academic Honor Code. Adopted in the first decade of the 20th century, the code emphasizes the importance of personal honor and moral integrity that reflect the honor and integrity of the Goucher community. As the primary authority to regulate student conduct in matters pertaining to the Academic Honor Code, the Student Government Association provides for the Academic Honor Board. Both the Academic Honor Code and Student Judicial Code may be found in the Campus Handbook. The associate dean for undergraduate studies may be consulted for information about the judicial process.

 

Academic Progress Toward a Degree

(*Note this may be different than the Financial Aid Regulations regarding academic progress.)

Students are expected to continue to make satisfactory academic progress towards a degree each term. Full-time students are expected to achieve this through the cumulative GPA requirements and Successful Credit Load. Both are described below.

GPA Standards:

At the end of each semester, the associate provost for undergraduate studies reviews the records of all students. The table below sets the minimum GPA standards set by the academic policies committee. Credits attempted include all transfer credits accepted by Goucher. GPAs listed in the table are based on Goucher work only.

Credits Attempted

0-27

28-57

over 57

Minimum GPA to remain in good standing

2.0*

2.0

2.0

Minimum GPA to remain at Goucher

1.6

1.7

1.8

       

*For first-semester first-year students only, the GPA to remain in good standing is 1.8.

As part of the continuing guidance offered to each Goucher student, the associate provost for undergraduate studies, in consultation with the dean of students, reviews and acts on the record of any student who does not meet the standards outlined above or who meets the standards but whose work shows a marked negative trend. This includes, but is not limited to, students earning one or more “F/FW” grades, one or more “NP” grades, or any combination of two or more “D”, “I”, or “W” grades in a single semester.  The review includes an assessment of each student’s academic achievement and an evaluation of extenuating circumstances and of the student’s potential for substantial academic improvement. This review determines the student’s academic standing.

With the exception of first semester first-year students, the associate provost for undergraduate studies may place the student on academic warning, probation, or suspension, or may dismiss the student from the college. In recognition of the challenges that may occur in a student’s transition from high school to college, first semester first-year students earning a semester GPA of less than 1.80 will be placed on academic probation. The college reserves the right to suspend or dismiss students who do not pass any courses in their first semester.

All students placed on academic probation are required to meet with an academic coach in ACE or the associate provost for undergraduate studies to develop an Academic Contract for College Success containing both required academic activities and personalized academic goals. Contracts will vary student to student, but each contract will minimally require regularly scheduled meetings with a team member in ACE, attending classes, and turning in assignments on time, as well as a goal for a semester GPA of at least 2.0. The contract will include a schedule that defines meeting the requirements of their academic. The contract will be shared with the student’s academic adviser.

A student on academic probation who does not create an Academic Contract for College Success by the first day of classes of probationary semester will be dismissed or suspended. The associate provost of undergraduate studies and the director of ACE, in consultation with the dean of students, will review student performance throughout the probationary semester.  Probationary students who meet the terms of their contract and achieve minimum GPA standards as agreed to in the Academic Contract for College Success will be placed on academic warning. Probationary students who meet the requirements and make progress towards the goals of their academic contract, but who still fall below the requirements for good academic standing, are placed on probation for one additional semester. Normally, students who fail to regain good academic standing after two consecutive probationary semesters will face dismissal. A student that does not comply with the requirements agreed upon in their Academic Contract for College Success will be suspended without appeal.

A student who is placed on academic probation may not hold any elected or appointed office in any college organization, participate in any varsity sport (with the exception of supervised on-campus training and practice sessions), or register for more than 16 credit hours in a semester. A student who has been suspended may apply for reinstatement following the completion of a minimum 12 credit hours, excluding summer school, at an accredited academic institution with no grade lower than a C-, or one year of successful work experience with a letter from the employer stating the dates of employment. A student who has been dismissed may not return to the college.

Successful Credit Load Standards:

Once a student has completed two full terms at Goucher College their academic record will be reviewed with emphasis toward successful completion. The table below sets the minimum standards set by the academic policies committee. Credits attempted include all transfer credits accepted by Goucher.

After 2 terms a full-time student must have successfully completed 24 credits at Goucher.

After 4 terms a full-time student must have successfully completed 54 credits at Goucher.

After 6 terms a full-time student must have successfully completed 87 credits at Goucher.

Note that attempted credits are not credits successfully completed. All courses that have NP, W or F/FW are considered as attempted credits.

On the basis of this review, the associate provost for undergraduate studies may suspend the student from the college. Students may write an appeal to the Academic Appeals Committee for this suspension and must present an academic plan for the remaining semesters at Goucher. The decision of the committee will be final. If it is agreed that the plan is feasible, the student will be required to adhere to the plan for all remaining semesters. A student who has been suspended may apply for reinstatement following the completion of a minimum 12 credit hours, excluding summer school, at an accredited academic institution with no grade lower than a C-, or one year of successful work experience with a letter from the employer stating the dates of employment.

Students are cautioned that they should be averaging 15 credits a semester if they plan on reaching the 120 credit minimum required for the BA degree in 4 years (i.e. 8 semesters x 15 credits = 120 credits).

Academic Advising

Curricular guidance in a student’s first and second years is offered by a faculty adviser who works with student to develop an academic plan of study. When students declare majors/minors, they choose faculty advisers in their major/minor department. The associate provost for undergraduate studies coordinates the advising process. All the information pertaining to the fulfillment of requirements for graduation is found in this catalogue. Ultimately, it is the students’ responsibility to monitor their progress toward the fulfillment of degree requirements. Students can track completion of their liberal education requirements (LERs) by viewing their Academic Plan on MyGoucher.

Academic Center for Excellence

The Academic Center for Excellence (ACE) is the academic support service designed to assist all Goucher students in developing those study and learning skills necessary for college success. ACE services include individual assistance in study skills offered by peer mentors, supplemental instruction led by student leaders, math lab, language lab, and study skills workshops. ACE also implements the academic adjustments for those students who submit documentation of a disability to the disabilities specialist.

Commencement

Commencement exercises are held once a year in May. In order to participate, a student must have completed all academic requirements for the appropriate degree and have settled all college accounts and all student disciplinary matters. A student who is in good academic standing (cumulative GPA of at least 2.0) and is within four credits of completing graduation requirements may participate in commencement exercises only if documentation demonstrates that the remaining credits will be completed by the August degree date of that year. Permission to participate in Commencement must be granted by the associate provost for undergraduate studies. Students must submit their requests, with documentation, to the associate provost at least three weeks prior to Commencement.

The college reserves the right to not permit the release of a cap and gown to any student who has not been cleared for graduation. Students completing graduation requirements in the summer will be awarded their degree in late August, and students completing requirements in the Fall will be awarded their degree in December. Exceptions to the commencement policy can only be made by the provost and are expected to be rare. Petitions for exception are only considered from students who have been enrolled in the spring for all remaining courses needed for participation in commencement exercises, and for whom unforeseen and unpreventable forces at the end of the semester are the cause of the failure to complete those courses. Such petitions must be submitted in writing to the provost three weeks prior to Commencement, and must be accompanied by an endorsement from one or more of the student’s faculty members or advisors.

Course Load

Fifteen semester hours are considered the norm. However, a full-time student may take as few as 12 credit hours in any semester. Students who elect fewer than 12 credit hours in a semester are considered to be part-time. The maximum number of credits students may take is as follows:

  • All students, unless otherwise restricted for academic standing or other reasons, may take up to 16 credit hours (fall and spring).
  • Students who have a cumulative GPA of at least 3.0 may take up to 18 credits per semester (fall and spring).
  • Students who, due to extraordinary circumstances, are in need of a heavier course load than the aforementioned academic credit limit policy allows may petition the associate provost for undergraduate studies.
  • Students taking more than 18 credits per semester will be charged the part-time tuition rate for additional credits.

Goucher credits taken over the summer and/or winter terms will not count toward the semester credit limit.

Audits

A full-time student may audit one or more courses a semester without additional charge. Election of the audit option must be done at the point of registration for the course or within the add/drop deadline for adding a course. Permission to audit must be obtained in writing from the instructor of each course. Successful completion of audits will result in an AU on the transcript. There will be no notation on the transcript in the case of unsuccessful completion or withdrawal from an audited course. Students may withdraw from an audit through the last day of classes. College policy prohibits changing an audit to credit or vice versa after the add/drop deadline. Faculty may request a student’s withdrawal from an audit if the audit requirements were not met.

 Policy on audit of Dance Courses:

 

  • Students who enroll for 18.0 or fewer credits in a semester, including the credit value of audited dance courses, will not have any additional tuition charges.
  • Students who enroll for more than 18.0 credits in a semester, including the credit value of audited dance courses, will be assessed a tuition charge of $300 per credit or $150 per half credit over the 18 credit limit.  For example, a student who enrolls for a total of 18.5 credits in a semester, including audited dance courses, will have an additional tuition charge of $150.  A student who enrolls for 19.0 credits, including audited dance courses, will have an additional charge of $300.  To add some perspective, the per credit tuition charge for students who take more than 18.0 credits in a semester (not including audited dance courses) will be $1,282 per credit next year.
  • Semester billing is based on a student’s course load as of the drop deadline. Students dropping/withdrawing from an audited dance course(s) after the 10th school day of the semester will not receive a refund.

Withdrawals from Courses

A student may drop a semester course without a withdrawal appearing on the transcript until the tenth day of class. If a student withdraws from a class after this time, the student will receive a grade of W. The last day to withdraw from a semester course with a W is the end of the 10th week. Deadlines for half-semester courses are in proportion to their seven-week length. Students should consult the important dates for students calendar for exact dates.

Add/Drop Deadlines for Courses

The last day a student may add a semester course is the fifth day of the semester. The last day a student may drop a semester course is the tenth day of the semester. If a student attempts to drop (withdraw from) a course after the tenth day, the student will receive a grade of “W”. 1st and 2nd seven week courses have their own deadlines. See the Official College Calendar for actual dates each term.

Course Examinations

Final examinations are given at the end of each semester. Unexcused absence from a final examination is counted as a failure on the examination. The semester officially ends at the close of the examination period. No course work is accepted after this time unless an incomplete has been authorized. Students are responsible for submitting examinations and other assigned work to the instructor when they are due.

Course Evaluations

A comprehensive system of student evaluation course and teaching is considered vital to the academic community. At the end of each course, students are expected to complete and return the course evaluation form distributed by the Committee on Reappointment, Promotion, and Tenure.

Determination of Rank

First-year, sophomore, junior, or senior rank is determined at the beginning of the fall and spring semesters. Rank is based on credits achieved as follows:

First-year: 0-26.99 credit hours
Sophomore: 27-56.99 credit hours
Junior: 57-86.99 credit hours
Senior: 87 or more credit hours

Grading System

The grading system at Goucher is as follows: A, excellent; B, good; C, satisfactory; D, poor; F, failing; FW, failed and didn’t withdraw; P, pass; NP, no pass; I, incomplete; AU, audit. The letter grades may be modified by plus or minus as follows: A-, B+, B-, C+, C-, D+, and D-. The incomplete is deleted from the student’s record when the grade for the course is submitted. PW and NW refer to college writing proficiency grades. PW refers to passing college writing proficiency, and NW refers to not passing college writing proficiency. W is defined under withdrawals. AU is defined under audits.

Students may choose to take two courses per academic year on a pass/no pass basis. In the regular semester, the pass/ no pass option must be submitted to the Office of the Registrar in Student Administrative Services by the end of the tenth week of classes; in half-semester courses, by the end of the third week. Pass is equivalent to any grade from A through C- as normally interpreted at Goucher College. Students who wish to switch from pass/no pass to graded status may do so up until week 10 of the semester (week three of seven-week courses). After that the choice is irrevocable. Courses elected with a pass/no pass option will not count toward requirements for the major or minor unless such courses are graded on a pass/no pass option only. A grade of P or NP will have no effect on a student’s grade point average.

Interinstitutional/BSEP courses and summer courses taken elsewhere are not ordinarily open to pass/no pass election. Department chairs may specify that an off-campus experience can be taken only on a pass/no pass basis; such a requirement is not part of the student’s pass/no pass quota. Courses elected with a pass/no pass option will not count toward requirements in the major or minor (unless such courses are required to be so graded). If a major requirement is taken pass/no pass, the department must require that the course be re-taken for a regular grade or identify an appropriate substitute.

The deadline for any grade changes is 12 months past the semester in which the grade was originally received.

Grade Appeal

The purpose of the Grade Appeal Policy is to establish a consistent procedure by which students may seek review of final grades assigned in undergraduate courses at Goucher College. Grades other than final course grades may not be appealed. The policy recognizes the right and responsibility of faculty members to exercise their professional judgment in evaluating academic performance and the right of students to have their academic performance judged in a fair and impartial manner.

Grounds for Appeal

The purpose of the Grade Appeal Policy is to establish a consistent procedure by which students may seek review of final grades assigned in undergraduate courses at Goucher College. Grades other than final course grades may not be appealed. The policy recognizes the right and responsibility of faculty members to exercise their professional judgment in evaluating academic performance and the right of students to have their academic performance judged in a fair and impartial manner.

A student may appeal a final course grade only on the grounds that

  1. the grade was assigned based on a miscalculation or clerical error;
  2. the grading standards for the course were not clearly articulated by the instructor, or the grade was assigned in a manner inconsistent with articulated standards;
  3. the grade was assigned on some basis other than performance in the course; or
  4. the grade was assigned in a manner other than that used for other students in the course. At all levels of review, the burden of demonstrating that a grade should be changed rests with the students. The deadline for any grade changes is 12 months past the semester in which the grade was originally received.

A copy of the procedures for appeals can be obtained from the Office of the Associate Provost for Undergraduate Studies.

Incompletes

A semester officially ends at the close of the examination period. No course work will be accepted by a faculty member after this time unless an extension has been agreed upon and documented in writing by the instructor and the student. The student is responsible for filing the signed incomplete form with Office of the Registrar.

Incompletes at Goucher College are given only for reasons beyond the student’s control, namely medical reasons or death in family. In all instances, the student must initiate application for an incomplete with the instructor and must be submitted to the Registrar’s Office by 5:00pm on the last day of classes of each semester. Incompletes are intended to apply to cases where the student has completed at least three-quarters of the work of the semester. The instructor has the right to deny an application for an incomplete.

Students applying for an incomplete after the deadline due to an emergency situation during exam week must submit the request for an incomplete, along with a petition for an exception to college policy, to the associate provost for undergraduate studies, prior to the submission of a grade. The associate provost will determine, in conversation with the instructor of the class, the eligibility of the application.

NOTE: The option to pursue an incomplete is only available until 5:00 p.m. on the last day of classes. After this date the student is required to request an exception to college policy that necessitates the completion and submission of a petition form as well as the Application for Incomplete Grade form. Both forms must be submitted to the Office of the Associate Provost for Undergraduate Studies. All requests will be reviewed but may not be granted.

 

Resolution of Incompletes

The resolution of an incomplete is the responsibility of the student and the instructor. The student should have all work completed as soon as possible but no later than the last day of the sixth week of the semester following the semester in which the incomplete was granted. The student should submit papers, projects, and examinations directly to the instructor. If the work has been completed by the last day of the sixth week, the instructor shall award a grade. Unresolved incompletes will be changed to an F on the transcript unless an extension until the end of the semester following the incomplete is granted by the associate provost. At that time, the incomplete is converted to an F if a grade is not submitted. Incompletes in Goucher Study Abroad programs/courses follow the same procedure/deadlines described above.

Repeated Courses

If a student repeats a course in which a failing grade was received, the initial failing grade and the new grade will both be averaged into the student’s GPA.

If a student repeats a course for which a grade of D+, D, or D- was received the first time, the student will receive a grade of RD+, RD, RD-, the second time the course is taken. This allows the grade to be averaged into the GPA but does not count the credits.

If a student repeats a course for which a grade of C- or above was received the first time, the student will receive a grade of XA, XB, XC, etc., the second time the course is taken. In this case, the credit will not be counted and the grade will not be averaged into the GPA.

Departments decide if a student must repeat a course in the major if the grade was below C-, or if they will permit the student to substitute another course for the major. Any department may set a policy that majors may not retake more than two courses required for the major for which they received a less than satisfactory grade. Ordinarily, no student may register for the same course more than twice, with the exception of special topic courses with different content. Approval must be obtained from the appropriate department chair if a student wishes to repeat a course beyond this limit. This policy does not include courses that may be repeated for credit as listed in this catalogue.

Calculation of the GPA 

Only courses completed at Goucher, through the interinstitutional(BSEP) cross-registration program, or through a Goucher sponsored program, are included in the GPA calculation. Each semester, the credit hour value of each course attempted for a grade is multiplied by the numerical value of the earned grade to determine the quality points earned. The total number of quality points earned in these courses is divided by the total number of graded credit hours attempted resulting in the GPA for the semester.

The cumulative GPA is the cumulative total of the quality points earned in all courses divided by the total number of graded credit hours attempted. The semester GPAs are not averaged together to create the cumulative average. The numerical value of grades is as follows: A=4.0, A-=3.67, B+=3.33 B=3.0, B-=2.67, C+=2.33, C=2.0, C-=1.67, D+=1.33, D=1.0, D-=0.67, F/FW=0.0

The following is an example of how to calculate a GPA:

Grade Earned Numerical Value of Grade Earned   Credit Hours   Quality Points       GPA
A 4 x 3 = 12        
B 3 x 4 = 12        

      7   24 ÷ 7 = 3.43

 

Academic Leaves of Absence

The college recognizes that many students derive educational and personal benefits from spending a period of time away from the campus to study at another institution or to pursue other appropriate educational goals. Students in good academic and financial standing may request a leave of absence for either one or two semesters. A leave generally begins at the end of a regular semester, and students are expected to return to the college at the conclusion of their leave. They will receive registration and housing information at the appropriate time in the semester preceding their return and are responsible for meeting all deadlines. The college reserves the right to postpone the date of return depending on available residential space. Students who leave Goucher without declaring a leave will be withdrawn and have to apply for reinstatement.

Students who take a leave of absence from the college to study at another institution in the United States should complete the non-Goucher course approval form available on the Registrar’s website. http://www.goucher.edu/x1893.xml.  It takes time to arrange an academic leave; therefore, students should begin discussing their plans at least a full semester in advance. To ensure academic credit, students should enroll at another institution as visiting nondegree students. They must obtain approval for the courses they have selected from their major adviser (to ensure that all major requirements will be fulfilled) and from the Registrar’s Office.

Students who wish to take a leave of absence for other reasons or wish to withdraw from the college should discuss their plans and seek approval from the dean of students or the associate provost for undergraduate studies. Exceptions for longer leaves for military service may be granted by the Provost and the Associate Provost for Undergraduate Studies.

Deadlines for Application for Leave:

The deadline for applying for leave is the add/drop deadline for the semester in which the student will be on leave.

Return from a Leave of Absence:

A student returning from a leave of absence does not need to apply for reinstatement. Students on leave are responsible for meeting regular college deadlines for filing for financial aid and for registering for housing and courses. 

Failure to return from a leave of absence: 

Students receiving Title IV financial aid who take a leave of absence are treated as having withdrawn from the college for financial aid purposes. This means that the six-month grace period for Federal Direct Loans begins the day after the last date of academic activity at the college. Thus, students who are federal loan recipients and fail to return from a leave of absence may trigger a requirement to begin repayment on student loans, if the federal period of deferral has expired. Contact the Office of Financial Aid to discuss the consequence of this changed status on outstanding loans.

Assessment

Goucher has an ongoing program of assessment to evaluate the effectiveness of the college and to insure that it is meeting its goal of providing a high quality education. The assessment program includes opinion surveys, interviews, and testing. Students are expected to participate in assessment activities throughout their time at Goucher.

Honors and Awards

Dean’s List

At the end of each semester, students who have demonstrated an exceptional level of academic achievement for that semester are named to the Dean’s List. The minimum grade point average for Dean’s List is as follows:

First-year: 3.50
Sophomores: 3.70
Juniors: 3.75
Seniors: 3.80

Full-time students must complete at least 12 graded credits in a given semester to be eligible. Part-time students must complete at least 12 graded credits within two semesters of a given academic year.

Honors at Graduation

A student may graduate having achieved one or more of two distinctions.

Honors in the Major

Honors in the major is designed to give recognition to outstanding work in the major. This designation is awarded on the recommendation of the faculty who have taught and supervised a student’s work in the major at the upper level. Requirements for honors in the major are determined by each department.

Latin Honors

Students who have taken at least 60 semester credit hours on a letter-grade basis at Goucher or as part of a Goucher sponsored study-abroad program may be awarded their degrees

  • summa cum laude with a grade point average of 3.9,
  • magna cum laude with a grade point average of 3.7 to 3.89, or
  • cum laude with a grade point average of 3.5 to 3.69.

Grade point averages are not rounded off for Latin honors. Transfer students may not be able to take courses pass/ no pass and still qualify for Latin honors unless they take a minimum of 60 graded credits in residence excluding pass/no pass.

Phi Beta Kappa

Goucher College, formerly the Woman’s College of Baltimore, was granted a charter by the Phi Beta Kappa national honor society in 1904 as the Beta of Maryland Chapter.

Students are eligible for election on the basis of academic standing and rules of eligibility established by the Senate of the Chapter. These rules stipulate a minimum grade point average of 3.5; in addition, no more than 10 percent of the credit hours completed ordinarily may be graded pass/no pass (courses that may not be taken for a grade do not count in the 10 percent). All college-level work is considered, but work done at Goucher is weighted more heavily. Achievements of these standards do not guarantee membership. Students must also demonstrate academic integrity, commitment to intellectual pursuits, and breadth within their academic program. The latter ordinarily requires a student to complete courses in each of the five divisions beyond those taken to satisfy the general education requirements.

Annual Prizes and Awards

The Corene Elaine Amoss ‘93 Memorial Prize is awarded to a junior or senior who has demonstrated extraordinary leadership in extracurricular endeavors.

The Alumni Prize for Excellence in Physics is awarded to a student who has distinguished him or herself through outstanding achievement in the field of physics, as demonstrated by a minimum GPA of 3.5 or higher in the major, and has displayed significant promise in independent research, as evidenced by publication in a scholarly journal or a presentation to the scientific community beyond campus borders.

The Alumnae/i Prize for Service in Physics is awarded each year to a student who has distinguished him or herself by exemplary service to the Physics program and greater community, both inside and beyond Goucher’s borders.

The Applestein-Sweren Book Collecting Prize is for personal collections of books and related ephemera. The competition encourages Goucher students to read for enjoyment, to develop personal libraries throughout their lives, and to appreciate the special qualities of printed or illustrated works.

The Marilyn Silverman Apter ‘41 Prize is awarded to an outstanding rising senior who has achieved high academic honors, served the college, and shown outstanding leadership qualities.

The Master of Arts in Arts Administration/Jean Wilhelm Award is awarded in recognition of outstanding work to a graduate student in arts administration presenting the best major paper in a given year.

The Milly Bielaski 1903 Prize in Chemistry is presented to an outstanding junior chemistry major.

The Borden-Gladding International Management Award is awarded to underwrite or supplement the expenses of junior Goucher students (or seniors for summer or fall semester) while they participate in an international internship to enhance the student’s career commitment to international business.

The Mary Hortop Bready ‘46 Prize for Social Service to Baltimore is awarded each year to a student that shows dedication and service to the Baltimore community.

The Dorothy E. Brody ‘35 Internship in Women’s Issues is awarded to a sophomore, junior or senior to help underwrite or offset the cost of an internship consisting of community service in an organization dedicated to improving the status and/or condition of women.

The Dorothy E. Brody ‘35 Prize for Achievement in Women’s Studies is awarded to a senior who has demonstrated academic excellence and/or produced outstanding scholarly work in women’s studies.

The Joan K. Burton Award in Sociology in honor of Joan K. Burton, beloved professor of Sociology who retired in 2012, recognizes a graduating senior who has demonstrated academic excellence, outstanding service to the department, and a commitment to social justice, qualities Professor Burton embodied during her tenure at Goucher.

The Calvin Prize in History is awarded to an outstanding history major.

The Coaches’ Award is given annually to one or more senior athletes who have best represented Goucher throughout four years of competition.

The Eleanor Denoon ‘36 Poetry Prize is sponsored by the Kratz Center for Creative Writing in memory of its founding donor, Eleanor Denoon. It is given to Goucher undergraduates “for serious, sustained work in poetry.”

The Distinguished Scholar Award is awarded to sophomores who have demonstrated a very high level of academic achievement and whose commitment to experiential learning is effected in their research or special project proposal.

The Gladys M. Dorsey ‘26 Memorial Award is given annually to a senior foreign language major who has demonstrated proficiency in one or more foreign languages and has made a contribution of time and talent to Goucher College. Preference will be given to French majors.

The Rhoda M. Dorsey Award is presented to a student who represents sustained leadership, commitment, teamwork, ingenuity, and an ability to work with fellow students, staff and administration.

The George Brendan Dowell Award in Theatre is given to recognize the achievement and high standing of a graduating senior in the Department of Theatre.

The Mary Katherine Boone Ekin ‘40 Prize in Computer Science is awarded to a senior majoring in computer science who is considered to have an excellent grasp of both theoretical and applied aspects of the subject. The criteria for the award include high achievement in course work and the ability to interpret the concepts of computer science in creative and imaginative ways.

The Nancy J. Engelhardt ‘64Memorial Prize in the Sciences is presented by the by the Alumni of the Beta of Maryland Chapter of Phi Beta Kappa for academic excellence in the sciences. The award is based on an outstanding piece of work prepared during the academic year as part of a course or independent study.

The Environmental Studies Prize Fund is awarded to a junior or senior environmental studies major with a 3.5 GPA or higher who has shown outstanding academic achievement.

The Neena Tolley Ewing ‘72 Memorial Award is awarded to an outstanding member of Goucher’s Equestrian Program.

The Excellence Award in Economics from the Baltimore Branch of the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond is awarded to a graduating student to recognize outstanding achievement in the study of economics.

The Erin Felarca ‘05 Memorial Academic Achievement Award is awarded to a graduating senior from the Communication and Media Studies Department ho has demonstrated excellence in academics and commitment to issues of diversity.

The Erin Felarca ‘05 Memorial Award for Travel Abroad based on both financial need and merit, is awarded to a student majoring in communication in his/her sophomore year who is planning a study abroad trip for the following (junior) academic year. The award will help finance an ICA or a semester abroad.

The Josephine E. Fiske Award is given annually to a non-senior female varsity athlete for service and leadership.

The Mary Ross Flowers ‘28 Award in Astronomy is given each year to a student of any major with the best project in astronomy.

The Friends of Goucher Dance Prize for Excellence in Track of Study is awarded to a graduating Dance major who has demonstrated excellence in his or her track of study.

The Friends of Goucher Dance Prize for Excellence in Leadership and Service is awarded to a graduating Dance major that has participated fully in departmental activities and has made a positive contribution to the Dance department.

The Friends of Goucher Dance Prize for Outstanding Achievement in the Major is awarded to a graduating dance major who participated fully in every aspect of the program, earned a cumulative GPA of 3.8 or higher in the major, pursued every opportunity for growth and development, and demonstrated professional commitment to the field of dance.

The Hilda Gabrilove ‘48 and Dr. Janice Gabrilove Dirzulaitis ‘73 Chemistry Prize is awarded for academic excellence in chemistry.

The German Prize of the Embassy of the Federal Republic of Germany is awarded annually to a Goucher student nominated by the German Department.

Goucher Achievement Award is a new honor established especially for sophomores as a way to recognize extraordinary service contributions, significant academic improvement, or sustained academic success during their first year at Goucher.

The Margaret Guccione Prize for Arts and Literature is a part of the Julia Rogers Research Prize that honors a paper in literature or arts and to honor Margaret’s long-standing role with the research prize.

The Ethelmarie Apter Halpern ‘42 Memorial Community Service Prize Fund is awarded to an undergraduate student who has demonstrated leadership in combating prejudice and fostering good relations within the community.

The Evenden Daley Herman ‘37 Endowed Prize Fund is awarded to a Goucher College full-time international or immigrant student who has demonstrated leadership and service in college and/or community activities and who promotes understanding among people of different nations.

The Julia Gontrum Hill Award in Music is for the student of the piano who has demonstrated distinction in musical performance and gives evidence of creative potential.

The Doris Sirkis Himelfarb ‘36 Endowed Prize is awarded to a student majoring in music with a concentration in classical music.

The Max Hochschild Prize for Excellence in Economics is awarded to the student who submits the best research paper in advanced work in economics. A copy of the prize-winning paper is deposited in the Goucher College Library.

The David Horn Prize in Organic Chemistry is awarded to a senior chemistry major for outstanding achievement in organic chemistry classes and research.

The Sarah T. Hughes 1917 Award for Academic Excellence in Politics and Public Policy is awarded to the senior who has the most outstanding record for academic achievement in politics and public policy.

The Sarah T. Hughes 1917 Award for Excellence in Intellectual Inquiry in International Relations is awarded to a senior major holding a GPA of at least 3.0 who demonstrates exceptional intellectual curiosity regarding politics and world affairs.

The Sarah T. Hughes 1917 Prize for Practical Politics is awarded to a junior or senior major for outstanding achievement in the practice of politics.

The Louise Kelley Prize in Chemistry is awarded annually to a senior major who has accomplished distinguished work in chemistry. Chemistry majors who plan to enter the field of teaching are given preference.

The Jessie L. King Prize is awarded to a senior who has done outstanding work in any science field included in Division III, with special consideration given to the study of mammalian physiology and/or microbiology.

The Ann Matthews Lacy Prize in Genetics is awarded to a student who has excelled in the field of genetics.

The Ann M. Lacy and Myra Berman Kurtz Fund for Student Research in the Biological Sciences is awarded to underwrite or supplement the presentation expenses incurred by Goucher students engaged in academic research in the biological sciences.

The Elizabeth Deale Lawrence ‘66 and Bryan Huntington Lawrence Prize for Innovative Teaching is awarded annually to either graduating seniors, in good academic and disciplinary standing at the college, who have been accepted by and are entering service in Teach for America; or recent alumnae/I who have graduated from Goucher in good academic and disciplinary standing and are currently serving in Teach for America.

The Pearl Davis Leavitt ‘28 Prize in Mathematics is given annually to a mathematics major who has exhibited meritorious achievements in mathematics.

The Stephen K. F. and Katherine W. Lee Prize in Historic Preservation is awarded each year to one or more master of arts in historic preservation students who have prepared the most outstanding paper or project that addresses diversity in America’s cultural and architectural heritage.

The Gloria Levine Prize in Communication and Media Studies in honor of Brownlee Sands Corrin is awarded annually to juniors or seniors enrolled in good standing in the undergraduate program at Goucher College, who have declared a major in the department of communication and media studies, and who have participated in a meaningful way in the media community of Goucher’s campus and/or the Baltimore metropolitan area. When possible, special consideration will be given to students who have demonstrated a commitment to the field of communication and show promising academic growth and performance in their particular communication and media studies discipline. 

The Robert E. Lewand “Beauty in Mathematics” Prize is awarded annually to the student(s) who provide(s) the most innovative, creative display of the beauty of mathematics as it occurs in Nature and the Universe. The display can be artistic, musical, or written, and should convey a mathematical concept or truth in a manner that can be appreciated by the entire community, and not exclusively those whose area of study strongly intersects mathematical sciences.

The Robert Lewand Team Academic Achievement Award is presented annually to the team whose members achieved the highest grade point average over the previous two semesters.
 

The Robert Hall Lewis Prize is awarded to one or more students for extraordinary achievement in music.

The Lee Snyder Lovett ‘33 Prize is awarded annually to a senior intending to study law.

 

 

The MACPA Outstanding Student Award is presented annually by the Maryland Association of Certified Public Accountants to a Management student who is outstanding in academic as well as extracurricular activities. In addition to a 3.0 overall GPA, with a minimum of 3.25 in accounting, the winner must demonstrate leadership skills and involvement in campus and community activities. They must also demonstrate their commitment to accounting by becoming a member of MACPA’s Tomorrow CPA Program.

The Jennifer Margolis Marquez ‘01 Prize in Environmental Sustainability is awarded annually to recognize students who demonstrate outstanding innovation and creativity in developing practical applications to environmental/ecological sustainability that have been implemented at Goucher College.

The Master of Arts in Historic Preservation Alumnae/i Prize is awarded annually to encourage and reward the outstanding entering student enrolled in the Master of Arts in Historic Preservation Program.

The Mathematics Writing Prize is awarded annually to the student who has demonstrated excellence in the exposition of classical mathematics.

The Hiram McCullough Award is presented each year to one or more master of arts in historic preservation students who have submitted a plan and received approval for their forthcoming thesis work.

The Gairdner B. Moment Award is presented annually to a student who has demonstrated superior achievement in the biological sciences, especially the field of animal development.

The Gail Davis Morris ‘53 Endowed Prize in Music in Honor of Otto Ortmann is awarded to a third- or fourth-year music major who has demonstrated exemplary artistic achievement.

The Joe Morton Award for Outstanding Achievement in Peace Studies is awarded to students who actualize their values as demonstrated by academic excellence, by commitment to and partnerships within the College and the Baltimore community, and by integrity in their personal conduct.

The Janet Sloane Muller ‘70 Award in English is given to a graduating English major with an outstanding academic record that includes substantial work in courses pertinent to a professional career in publishing and/or journalism.

The Rolf E. Muuss Prize Fund in Special Education is awarded to the most promising student in the area of special education.

The Neumann Award is awarded to the student who best exemplifies the true spirit of physical education by setting an example for all to follow through his/her loyalty, dedication, and service to the ideals of physical education.

The Martha A. Nichols ‘38 Prize is given to the student who has shown outstanding service to the Goucher community.

The Janet F. Nolan ‘98 Prize in Psychology is awarded to students majoring in psychology who have achieved exceptional intellectual and experiential distinction.

The Elizabeth Nuss Emerging Leader Award is presented to a first or second year student who has contributed significantly to the Goucher community through his/her involvement in a campus organization or community service program, and who show significant potential for continued leadership and civic engagement.

The Phi Beta Kappa Brooke Peirce Award is presented by the alumnae/i of the Beta of Maryland Chapter of Phi Beta Kappa each year for academic excellence. The basis for each award is an outstanding piece of work completed as part of a course, internship, or independent work, except senior theses, during the past two semesters. The competition is open to all full-time juniors and seniors currently enrolled at Goucher College.

The Beverly and George Pollock Memorial Prize is awarded to an outstanding music major who has demonstrated academic achievement and proficiency in musical performance. 

The Gertrude Sherby Rand ‘33 Prize is awarded to a senior in visual arts who has made a distinguished contribution to both curricular and extracurricular college life.

The Lizette Woodworth Reese Awards are given to junior and senior English majors who have shown excellence in writing prose or poetry.

The Julia Rogers Research Prize sponsored by the Friends of the Goucher College Library, for outstanding research by Goucher students using library resources.

The Mary Carmen Rose Prize in Philosophy supported by the Ruth A. Katz Fund is awarded annually to a senior who has demonstrated outstanding work and shows unusual promise in philosophy.

The Ruth Blaustein Rosenberg ‘21 Prize in Music is given to a senior who has demonstrated excellence in the study of music and gives evidence of creative potential.

The Scholar-Athlete Award is presented annually to a member of the Junior Class who has consistently demonstrated varied and admirable participation in athletics and extracurricular activities, in conjunction with maintaining high standards of academic achievement.

The Shirley C. Seagren ‘53 Prize for International Studies is awarded to a Goucher College junior who has demonstrated meritorious academic achievement in the exploration of international issues, languages, and cultures and has participated in a Goucher College sponsored study abroad program.

Senior Leadership Awards honor those seniors whose contributions to campus life have been especially significant.

The Leah Seidman Shaffer ‘26 Prize in Microbiology is awarded each year to a student who has conducted outstanding independent study in which the concepts and methods of microbiology were used.

The Tillie Snyder Schonfield ‘36 Prize in Biology is awarded annually to a graduating senior or seniors enrolled in good standing in the undergraduate program at Goucher College who has done outstanding work in the field of biology. Biology majors who plan to enter the field of teaching will be given preference.

The Helen Carroll Shelley ‘24 Prize in Romance Languages is awarded to a student majoring in the romance languages.

The Ariel Singer Prize has been established to recognize achievements and/or contributions of a student within the environmental studies program.

The Edith Ford Sollers ‘31 Memorial Award in Chemistry is an annual prize for a senior major in chemistry who exhibits a high degree of distinction in scientific study and qualities of character and leadership in campus activities.

The Stephania Maniosky Sommerman ‘34 Prize Fund is awarded to a student enrolled in the college’s music program. Preference is given to students who have demonstrated academic achievement and proficiency in musical performance.

The Eleanor Spencer Award is a grant to underwrite travel expenses for students doing independent study projects in art history. The award is determined by a competitive application process that assesses the merits of the research project.

 The Student Employee of the Year Award is presented annually to a student who has contributed significantly to the Goucher community through his/her employment in a campus department. The award is based on a student’s reliability, contribution, quality of work, disposition, and initiative.

The Beulah B. Tatum Award in Education is given to a senior major who is considered an outstanding and promising student in the field of education.

The Isabelle Kellogg Thomas English Prize is presented annually to the sophomore and junior who rank best in English. Written and spoken English and knowledge of American literature are determining factors.

The Ruth Baird Thompson ‘31 Award for Scholarship, Sportsmanship, and Athleticism is presented annually to the student who consistently demonstrates these qualities.

The Marian M. Torrey Prize in Mathematics is awarded to a senior major in mathematics who is judged by the department to have an excellent record based on a firm grasp of subject matter, creative imagination, incisive thinking, and ability to present ideas clearly.

The Education Prize in Honor of Eli Velder is awarded to one or more graduating seniors who have completed the requirements for certification in teaching at a secondary level and who have demonstrated exceptional performance in the field of education.

The Betty Cooper Wallerstein ‘58 Prize Fund in Sociology is awarded in honor of Leona S. Morris ‘35 to one or more students majoring in sociology who demonstrate service leadership and academic excellence.

The Ruth C. Wylie Prize is awarded annually to a senior psychology major who best exemplifies a promising psychology student.

The Yousem Family Endowed Fund for Mentored Student Research was established to provide need-based financial aid to students actively involved in scholarly research with a faculty member at Goucher College. Annual income from the fund shall be used to provide need-based financial aid to a student(s) actively pursuing mentored scholarly research as an undergraduate at Goucher College.

Fellowships

Special fellowships are available to graduating seniors of Goucher College for full-time graduate work. Applications for fellowships should be made on forms secured from the associate provost for undergraduate studies and should be returned to the associate provost no later than March 1. For the Class of 1905, the Eleanor Voss, and the Flora E. Langdon Fellowships, need is also a criterion. Applicants must complete the Financial Aid Form and submit it directly to Student Administrative Services no later than March 1.

For Graduates of Goucher College:

The Class of 1905 Fellowships are intended to support Goucher Course graduates in their pursuit of graduate study in international affairs.

The Elizabeth King Ellicott Fellowships are awarded each year to graduates of Goucher College for the study of government and politics in the U.S.

The Flora E. Langdon Fellowship provides tuition assistance to women of exceptional ability in the pursuit of graduate studies at an American university well-recognized for its facilities for graduate work in botany.

The Jo DeGraw Mears Fund in Library Science provides fellowships for Goucher graduates who pursue advanced studies in library science.

The Stimson-Duvall Fellowship is awarded to graduates who show professional promise and outstanding qualifications for graduate studies in the natural, physical, biological, and medical sciences or the related field of history of science.

The Dean Van Meter Alumnae/i Fellowships are intended to support Goucher College graduates in their pursuit of graduate or professional study, in this country or abroad.

The Eleanor Voss ‘56 Fellowship is awarded annually to a graduating senior who will pursue the study of law. Preference is given to students who will attend Harvard Law School. In the event there is no highly qualified student intending to study law, the fellowship may be awarded to a graduating senior in the field of international relations, economics, history, or political science who has achieved the highest academic record among the senior majors in those fields and who intends to pursue graduate work.

For Undergraduate Students of Goucher College:

The Mary Derrickson McCurdy ‘30 Fellowship is awarded to provide support for students to do research or advanced course work at a marine biology laboratory.

The Florence B. & Mabel V. Seibert Fellowship is used for fellowships or activities in the field of bio-chemistry.

The Brooke and Carol Peirce Fellowships award undergraduates in all disciplines the opportunity to conduct significant original research using materials in Special Collections & Archives at Goucher College.